Bacchus in Romantic England

Bacchus in Romantic England describes real drunkenness among writers and ordinary people in the Romantic age.

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Author: A. Taylor

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230377202

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 813

Bacchus in Romantic England describes real drunkenness among writers and ordinary people in the Romantic age. It grounds this 'reality' in writings by doctors and philanthropists from 1780 onwards, who describe an epidemic of drunkenness. These commentators provide a context for the different ways that poets and novelists of the age represent drunkards. Wordsworth writes poems and essays evaluating the drunken career of his model Robert Burns. Charles Lamb's essays and letters reveal a real and metaphorical preoccupation with his own drinking as a way of disguising his personal suffering; his companion Coleridge writes drinking songs, essays about drunkenness, and meditations about his own weakness of will that show both festive inebriety and consciousness of an inward abyss; Coleridge's son Hartley, whose fate his father had prophesied, experiences drunkenness as the life-long humiliation described in his poems and letters. Keats's complex dionysianism runs through 'Endymion' and the late odes, setting him at odds with his temperate hero Milton. Men in the Romantic age, such as Sheridan, Byron, Moor, and Clare, celebrate rowdy friendship with tales and songs of drinking; Romantic women novelists such as Smith, Edgeworth and Wollstonecraft depict these men stumbling home to abuse their wives. Although excessive drinking is real in the period, observers and participants can still maintain ambivalence about its power to release or to debase the human being.

Bacchus in Romantic England

Bacchus in Romantic England: Writers and Drink 1780-1830 is the first study to describe the bulk and variety of writings about drinking; to set these poems, novels, essays, letters and journals in a historical, sociological, and medical ...

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Author: Anya Taylor

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 0312214995

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 411

Although many books have studied writers and alcohol in modern American literature, the rich culture of drinking and the many poems and narratives about it in the Romantic period in England have been entirely neglected. Bacchus in Romantic England: Writers and Drink 1780-1830 is the first study to describe the bulk and variety of writings about drinking; to set these poems, novels, essays, letters and journals in a historical, sociological, and medical context; to demonstrate the importance of drunkenness in the works of a number of major and minor writers of the period; and to suggest that during these years, for a short time, the pleasures and pains of drinking are held in a vivacious balance. The book argues that the figure of the drinker tests the margins of the human being, either as a beast, savage, or thing or, on the other edge of the human range, as a free, inspired spirit.

The Romantic Tavern

7 This is also the assumption of Anya Taylor, whose Bacchus in Romantic England interrogates the productive ambivalence about the pleasure and pains of drinking in writing by Burns, Lamb, Coleridge, and Keats.8Taylor's primary interest ...

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Author: Ian Newman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108470377

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 278

An examination of taverns in the Romantic period, with a particular focus on architecture and the culture of conviviality.

Bacchus in Romantic England

Bacchus in Romantic England describes real drunkenness among writers and ordinary people in the Romantic age. It grounds this 'reality' in writings by doctors and philanthropists from 1780 onwards, who describe an epidemic of drunkenness.

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Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 1349405604

Category:

Page: 277

View: 568

Bacchus in Romantic England describes real drunkenness among writers and ordinary people in the Romantic age. It grounds this 'reality' in writings by doctors and philanthropists from 1780 onwards, who describe an epidemic of drunkenness. These commentators provide a context for the different ways that poets and novelists of the age represent drunkards. Wordsworth writes poems and essays evaluating the drunken career of his model Robert Burns. Charles Lamb's essays and letters reveal a real and metaphorical preoccupation with his own drinking as a way of disguising his personal suffering; his companion Coleridge writes drinking songs, essays about drunkenness, and meditations about his own weakness of will that show both festive inebriety and consciousness of an inward abyss; Coleridge's son Hartley, whose fate his father had prophesied, experiences drunkenness as the life-long humiliation described in his poems and letters. Keats's complex dionysianism runs through 'Endymion' and the late odes, setting him at odds with his temperate hero Milton. Men in the Romantic age, such as Sheridan, Byron, Moor, and Clare, celebrate rowdy friendship with tales and songs of drinking; Romantic women novelists such as Smith, Edgeworth and Wollstonecraft depict these men stumbling home to abuse their wives. Although excessive drinking is real in the period, observers and participants can still maintain ambivalence about its power to release or to debase the human being.

Romantic Dynamics

Jeffrey C. Robinson RECEPTION AND POETICS IN KEATS 'My Ended Poet' Anya Taylor BACCHUS IN ROMANTIC ENGLAND Writers and Drink, 1780–1830 Michael Wiley ROMANTIC GEOGRAPHY Wordsworth and Anglo-European Spaces Eric Wilson EMERSON'S SUBLIME ...

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Author: M. Lussier

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230597501

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 465

Romantic Dynamics creatively collides English poetry with a wide range of exotic concepts associated with the 'new physics' of relativity and quantum to uncover their shared concerns for indeterminacy, uncertainty, relativity, and complexity in a chaotic universe. This interdisciplinary work traces the elaboration of dynamical models of cosmos and consciousness in works by Blake, Byron, Coleridge, the Shelleys and Wordsworth, finding in those works an exploration of the interpenetration of psyche and phenomena. This model, the author argues, establishes a new metaphoric terrain liberated from the classical mechanics of Newtonian thought and more easily traversed with models articulated by Bohr, Einstein and Hawking.

The Politics of Romantic Poetry

Jeffrey C. Robinson RECEPTION AND POETICS IN KEATS 'My Ended Poet' Anya Taylor BACCHUS IN ROMANTIC ENGLAND Writers and Drink, 1780–1830 Michael Wiley ROMANTIC GEOGRAPHY Wordsworth and Anglo-European Spaces Eric Wilson EMERSON'S SUBLIME ...

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Author: R. Cronin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230287051

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 225

View: 988

In recent years critics of Romantic poetry have divided into two groups that have little to say to one another. One group, as yet the most numerous, insists that to study a poem is to investigate the historical circumstances out of which it was produced; the other retorts that poetry offers pleasures fully available only to readers whose attention is focused on their language. This book attempts to reconcile the two groups by arguing that a poet's most effective political action is the forging of a new language, and that the political import of a poem is a function of its style.

Romantic Geography

... Radicalism and the Public Sphere Ashton Nichols THE REVOLUTIONARY 'I': Wordsworth and the Politics of Self-Presentation Jeffrey C. Robinson RECEPTION AND POETICS IN KEATS: 'My Ended Poet' Anya Taylor BACCHUS IN ROMANTIC ENGLAND: ...

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Author: M. Wiley

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230374263

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 212

View: 602

Grounded in historical sources and informed by recent work in cultural, sociological, geographical and spatial studies, Romantic Geography illuminates the nexus between imaginative literature and geography in William Wordsworth's poetry and prose. It shows that eighteenth-century social and political interest groups contested spaces through maps, geographical commentaries and travel literature; and that by configuring 'utopian' landscapes Wordsworth himself participated in major social and political controversies in post-French Revolutionary England.

The Romantic Cult of Shakespeare

Ashton Nichols THE REVOLUTIONARY 'I': Wordsworth and the Politics of Self-Presentation Jeffrey C. Robinson RECEPTION AND POETICSINKEATS: 'My Ended Poet' Anya Taylor BACCHUS IN ROMANTIC ENGLAND: Writers and Drink, 1780—1830 Michael Wiley ...

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Author: P. Davidhazi

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230372122

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 353

Focusing on England, Hungary and on some other European countries, the book explores the latent religious patterns in the appropriation of Shakespeare from the 1769 Stratford Jubilee to the tercentenary of Shakespeare's birth in 1864. It shows how the Shakespeare cult used quasi-religious (verbal and ritual) means of reverence, how it made use of some romantic notions, and how the ensuing quasi-transcendental authority was utilized for political purposes. The book suggests a theoretical framework and a comprehensive anthropological context for the interpretation of literature.

Coleridge and the Romantic Newspaper

Taussig, Gurion, Coleridge and the Idea of Friendship, 1789–1804 (Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, 2002). Taylor, Anya, Bacchus in Romantic England: Writers and Drink, 1780–1830 (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999).

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Author: Heidi Thomson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319319780

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 274

View: 133

This book examines how Coleridge staged his private woes in the public space of the newspaper. It looks at his publications in the Morning Post, which first published one of his most famous poems, Dejection. An Ode. It reveals how he found a socially sanctioned public outlet for poetic disappointments and personal frustrations which he could not possibly articulate in any other way. Featuring fresh, contextual readings of established major poems; original readings of epigrams, sentimental ballads, and translations; analyses of political and human-interest stories, this book reveals the remarkable extent to which Coleridge used the public medium of the newspaper to divulge his complex and ambivalent private emotions about his marriage, his relationship with the Wordsworths and the Hutchinsons, and the effect of these dynamics on his own poetry and poetics.

The Pub in Literature

8-10 . 38 Anya Taylor , Bacchus in Romantic England : Writers and Drink , 1780-1830 ( Houndmills , Basingstoke , Macmillan , 1999 ) , pp . 94-5 . 39 Keats , Letters , 5 January 1818 . 40 Taylor , Bacchus , p . 96 .

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Author: Steven Earnshaw

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719053056

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 385

Steven Earnshaw traces the many roles of the drinking house in literature from Chaucer's time to the end of the 20th century, taking in the better-known hostelries, such as Hal's and Falstaff's Boar's Head in Henry IV, and the inns of Dickens.