Captivity in War during the Twentieth Century

This book offers new international perspectives on captivity in wartime during the twentieth century.

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Author: Marcel Berni

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 3030650944

Category: History

Page: 182

View: 880

This book offers new international perspectives on captivity in wartime during the twentieth century. It explores how global institutions and practices with regard to captives mattered, how they evolved and most importantly, how they influenced the treatment of captives. From the beginning of the twentieth century, international organisations, neutral nations and other actors with no direct involvement in the respective wars often had to fill in to support civilian as well as military captives and to supervise their treatment. This edited volume puts these actors, rather than the captives themselves, at the centre in order to assess comparatively their contributions to wartime captivity. Taking a global approach, it shows that transnational bodies - whether non-governmental organisations, neutral states or individuals - played an essential role in dealing with captives in wartime. Chapters cover both the largest wars, such as the two World Wars, but also lesser-known conflicts, to highlight how captives were placed at the centre of transnational negotiations.

Captivity in War During the Twentieth Century

scientists have called the “first transnational century.”23 For example, both the Quakers and the YMCA played a major role in the welfare of captives during the twentieth century, mainly in Europe. Additionally, some Catholic charities ...

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Author: Marcel Berni

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030650957

Category: Electronic books

Page: 188

View: 972

This book offers new international perspectives on captivity in wartime during the twentieth century. It explores how global institutions and practices with regard to captives mattered, how they evolved and most importantly, how they influenced the treatment of captives. From the beginning of the twentieth century, international organisations, neutral nations and other actors with no direct involvement in the respective wars often had to fill in to support civilian as well as military captives and to supervise their treatment. This edited volume puts these actors, rather than the captives themselves, at the centre in order to assess comparatively their contributions to wartime captivity. Taking a global approach, it shows that transnational bodies - whether non-governmental organisations, neutral states or individuals - played an essential role in dealing with captives in wartime. Chapters cover both the largest wars, such as the two World Wars, but also lesser-known conflicts, to highlight how captives were placed at the centre of transnational negotiations. Marcel Berni is a Research and Teaching Fellow at the Swiss Military Academy at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. He specialises in the history of the Cold War. His dissertation on the treatment of communist captives during Vietnam's American War has won the Andre Corvisier Prize. Tamara Cubito is a Research and Teaching Fellow at the Swiss Military Academy at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. She recently completed her PhD on the treatment of enemy aliens in the British colonies during the First World War.

Wartime Captivity in the 20th Century

This wide-ranging volume brings together an international selection of scholars to trace the contours of this evolving research agenda, offering fascinating new perspectives on historical moments that range from the early days of the Great ...

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Author: Anne-Marie Pathé

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781785332593

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 396

Long a topic of historical interest, wartime captivity has over the past decade taken on new urgency as an object of study. Transnational by its very nature, captivity’s historical significance extends far beyond the front lines, ultimately inextricable from the histories of mobilization, nationalism, colonialism, law, and a host of other related subjects. This wide-ranging volume brings together an international selection of scholars to trace the contours of this evolving research agenda, offering fascinating new perspectives on historical moments that range from the early days of the Great War to the arrival of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay.

War and Displacement in the Twentieth Century

This book brings together a collection of inter-disciplinary works by scholars who are currently producing some of the most innovative and influential work on the subject of displacement in war, in order to share their knowledge and ...

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Author: Sandra Barkhof

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317961864

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 605

Human displacement has always been a consequence of war, written into the myths and histories of centuries of warfare. However, the global conflicts of the twentieth century brought displacement to civilizations on an unprecedented scale, as the two World Wars shifted participants around the globe. Although driven by political disputes between European powers, the consequences of Empire ensured that Europe could not contain them. Soldiers traversed continents, and civilians often followed them, or found themselves living in territories ruled by unexpected invaders. Both wars saw fighting in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and the Far East, and few nations remained neutral. Both wars saw the mass upheaval of civilian populations as a consequence of the fighting. Displacements were geographical, cultural, and psychological; they were based on nationality, sex/gender or age. They produced an astonishing range of human experience, recorded by the participants in different ways. This book brings together a collection of inter-disciplinary works by scholars who are currently producing some of the most innovative and influential work on the subject of displacement in war, in order to share their knowledge and interpretations of historical and literary sources. The collection unites historians and literary scholars in addressing the issues of war and displacement from multiple angles. Contributors draw on a wealth of primary source materials and resources including archives from across the world, military records, medical records, films, memoirs, diaries and letters, both published and private, and fictional interpretations of experience.

Prisoners in War

In conventional wars during the twentieth century, however, POW camps became the prevailing feature of captivity. With their emergence, and in particular with the increased economic requirements created by the comprehensive ...

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Author: Sibylle Scheipers

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199577576

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 371

"Result of a conference on 'Prisoners in War' conducted by the Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War in December 2007 at Oxford University"--Acknowledgements.

Captives of War

... and the twentieth century. Compared to the First World War, there is still much research to be carried out. Only two historians have put masculinity centre stage in their monographs on British servicemen: Martin Francis's The Flyer, ...

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Author: Clare Makepeace

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107145870

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 360

Capture-- Imprisoned servicemen -- Bonds between men -- Ties with home -- Going "round the bend" -- Liberation -- Resettling -- Conclusion

Indian Captivity in Spanish America

This important book is thus multidisciplinary in its concept, providing ethnographic, historical, and literary insights into the lives and customs of Native Americans and their captives in the New World.

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Author: Fernando Operé

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015073982780

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 653

Even before the arrival of Europeans to the Americas, the practice of taking captives was widespread among Native Americans. Indians took captives for many reasons: to replace—by adoption—tribal members who had been lost in battle, to use as barter for needed material goods, to use as slaves, or to use for reproductive purposes. From the legendary story of John Smith's captivity in the Virginia Colony to the wildly successful narratives of New England colonists taken captive by local Indians, the genre of the captivity narrative is well known among historians and students of early American literature. Not so for Hispanic America. Fernando Operé redresses this oversight, offering the first comprehensive historical and literary account of Indian captivity in Spanish-controlled territory from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. Originally published in Spanish in 2001 as Historias de la frontera: El cautiverio en la América hispánica, this newly translated work reveals key insights into Native American culture in the New World’s most remote regions. From the "happy captivity" of the Spanish military captain Francisco Nuñez de Pineda y Bascuñán, who in 1628 spent six congenial months with the Araucanian Indians on the Chilean frontier, to the harrowing nineteenth-century adventures of foreigners taken captive in the Argentine Pampas and Patagonia; from the declaraciones of the many captives rescued in the Rio de la Plata region of Argentina in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, to the riveting story of Helena Valero, who spent twenty-four years among the Yanomamö in Venezuela during the mid-twentieth century, Operé's vibrant history spans the entire gamut of Spain’s far-flung frontiers. Eventually focusing on the role of captivity in Latin American literature, Operé convincingly shows how the captivity genre evolved over time, first to promote territorial expansion and deny intercultural connections during the colonial era, and later to romanticize the frontier in the service of nationalism after independence. This important book is thus multidisciplinary in its concept, providing ethnographic, historical, and literary insights into the lives and customs of Native Americans and their captives in the New World.

Cold War Captives

Captivity's ubiquity also reflected material circumstance in that millions of individuals experienced different forms ... THE INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF IM/MOBILITY Barely into middle age, the twentieth century had already attracted many ...

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Author: Susan Lisa Carruthers

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520257306

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 978

Susan Carruthers offers a provocative history of early Cold War America, in which she recreates a time when World War III seemed imminent. She shows how central to American opinion at the time was a fascination with captivity & escape. Captivity became a way to understand everything.

Colonial Captivity during the First World War

Hew Strachan's To Arms remains the most complete attempt to look at the war's extra-European theatres from a ... fits or does not fit into the treatment of prisoners and captives in wartime over the course of the twentieth century.

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Author: Mahon Murphy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108509879

Category: History

Page:

View: 981

With the outbreak of war in 1914, an estimated 30,000 German civilians in African and Asian colonies were violently uprooted and imprisoned. Britain's First World War internment of German settlers seriously challenged the structures that underpinned nineteenth-century imperialism. Through its analysis of this internment, this book highlights the impact that the First World War had on the notion of a common European 'civilising mission' and the image of empire in the early twentieth century. Mahon Murphy examines the effect of the war on a collective European colonial identity, perceptions of internment in the extra-European theatres of war, and empires in transition during war. Policymakers were forced to address difficult questions about the future rule of Germany's colonies and the nature of empire in general. Far from a conflict restricted to European powers, the First World War triggered a worldwide remaking of ideas, institutions and geopolitics.

POWs and the Great War

Captivity on the Eastern Front Alon Rachamimov ... With the chronological end of the twentieth century in mind, a number of prominent historians turned their attention to the event that in the opinion of many constituted the 'primordial ...

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Author: Alon Rachamimov

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 9781845206321

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 890

Joint Winner of Fraenkel Prize for Contemporary History 2001, London. Winner of Talmon Prize, Israel, awarded by the Israeli Academy of Sciences. Although it was one of the most common experiences of combatants in World War I, captivity has received only a marginal place in the collective memory of the Great War and has seemed unimportant compared with the experiences of soldiers on the Western Front. Yet this book, focusing on POWs on the Eastern Front, reveals a different picture of the War and the human misery it produced. During four years of fighting, approximately 8.5 million soldiers were taken captive, of whom nearly 2.8 million were Austro-Hungarians. This book is the first to consider in-depth the experiences of these prisoners during their period of incarceration. How were POWs treated in Russia? What was the relationship between prisoners and their home state? How were concepts of patriotism and loyalty employed and understood? Drawing extensively on original letters and diaries, Rachamimov answers these and other searching questions. In the process, major omissions in previous historiography are addressed. Anyone wishing to have a rounded history of the Great War will find this book fills a major gap.