Cleveland Metroparks

He tells the park's story with pictures from a wide range of local sources , including the Cleveland State University Library , local historical societies , and the park's own collection . The Images of America series celebrates the ...

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Author: Thomas G. Matowitz

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738540692

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 654

A century ago, William A. Stinchcomb, aged 27, closed his annual report as chief engineer of parks for the City of Cleveland with a challenge to create an outer ring of parks and boulevards to benefit all residents of Greater Cleveland. By 1912, legislation authorizing it had been enacted, and three acres of land were acquired through a donation. This formed the nucleus of the vast park system that now includes almost 21,000 acres. Cleveland Metroparks has provided generations of area residents with readily accessible facilities for year-round recreation. The park provides opportunities for hiking, horseback riding, swimming, cycling, golfing, and boating. Use of the park, which crosses the boundaries of approximately 48 communities in the Cleveland area, has become a tradition for many families. A century ago, William A. Stinchcomb, aged 27, closed his annual report as chief engineer of parks for the City of Cleveland with a challenge to create an outer ring of parks and boulevards to benefit all residents of Greater Cleveland. By 1912, legislation authorizing it had been enacted, and three acres of land were acquired through a donation. This formed the nucleus of the vast park system that now includes almost 21,000 acres. Cleveland Metroparks has provided generations of area residents with readily accessible facilities for year-round recreation. The park provides opportunities for hiking, horseback riding, swimming, cycling, golfing, and boating. Use of the park, which crosses the boundaries of approximately 48 communities in the Cleveland area, has become a tradition for many families.

Bay Village

... from demolition by having it moved by barge on Lake Erie to be relocated in Huntington Park in the Cleveland Metroparks . The Images of America series celebrates the history of neighborhoods , towns , and cities across the country .

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Author: Virginia L. Peterson

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738550523

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 434

Tucked away in the northeast corner of Cuyahoga County, Bay Village lies just outside Cleveland. The first settlers arrived around 1810 during the nation's westward expansion. The village was primarily agrarian in the beginning, home to many vineyards. By the end of the 1800s, the Industrial Revolution had gained momentum, and in 1896, an electric railway was built through the city, running from Cleveland to Toledo. Bay Village evolved from a fishing and farming hamlet into a retreat and resort area for some of Cleveland's wealthiest families. Many of their summer cottages still stand today as refurbished family homes. Bay Village explores this community's rich history through vintage images from the Bay Village Historical Society and the Bay Village Library.

Civil War Soldiers of Greater Cleveland

He is the author of the books Images of America: North Olmsted and Then & Now: Olmsted. ... and volunteer for events held at the Olmsted Historical Society's Frostville Museum in the Rocky River Reservation of the Cleveland Metroparks.

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Author: Dale Thomas

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781625845412

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 655

The Civil War interrupted the area around Cleveland, Ohio, in the middle of its great leap into prosperity, redirecting its men into military camps and its industrial strength into munitions and provisions. Dale Thomas roots his story in the letters that kept the ordinary soldiers from Cuyahoga County tethered to their families and friends on the home front, even as they moved from battlefield to battlefield, through sickness and captivity. For many, these letters were the only part of them to make it back--their final legacy to a community they had helped to build.

Norton

Norton Township was named for proprietor and principal landowner Birdsey Norton, a wealthy merchant from Goshen, Connecticut. However, he never set foot in Norton--he died six years before the township was organized in 1818.

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Author: Lisa Ann Merrick

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467114417

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 575

Norton Township was named for proprietor and principal landowner Birdsey Norton, a wealthy merchant from Goshen, Connecticut. However, he never set foot in Norton--he died six years before the township was organized in 1818. Early settlers, the first of whom were James Robinson and John Cahow, carved their way through the wilderness to build on this fertile land. In its early form, Norton included seven small hamlets: Loyal Oak, Western Star, Sherman, Johnson's Corners, Norton Center, Hametown, and New Portage. Each hamlet had its own unique shops, taverns, blacksmiths, and mills. These communities were home to familiar local names like Seiberling, VanHyning, Harris, Miller, Oplinger, and Breitenstine. By 1961, Norton had become recognized as a village, and by 1968 its growth warranted the designation of city. Early businesses, local schools and churches, aerial views, accidents, and intrigue can all be found within the pages of Images of America: Norton.

Historic Mill Creek Park

Founded in 1891 as OhioÃ's first park district, Mill Creek Park encompasses a unique wealth of natural and designed features that have been the backdrop for generations of family memories, spanning three centuries.

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Author: Carol Potter

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 073853952X

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 796

Founded in 1891 as OhioÃ's first park district, Mill Creek Park encompasses a unique wealth of natural and designed features that have been the backdrop for generations of family memories, spanning three centuries. A remarkable visionary, park founder Volney Rogers argued that the land itself could improve the lives of YoungstownÃ's residents. Through fresh air for mill-weary lungs and tree laced horizons for workroom-bound spirits, he knew a park would make the community a better place for families. And he succeeded magnificently. Rogers and the nationally known landscape architects that he hired created breathtaking vistas of LantermanÃ's Falls and scenic gorges and designed trails, drives, and three pleasure lakes. Other park features include nature preserves, display gardens, recreational fields, a Donald Ross-designed golf course, and a legacy of historic structures. Mill Creek Park indeed has earned its legendary claim as the most beautiful urban park in America.

Spoken from the Heart

Among its many contributions, IMLS helped to provide opportunities to train Native Americans to preserve their past in Arizona, and support interpreters for African-American history in Brooklyn. It worked with the Cleveland Metroparks ...

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Author: Laura Bush

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439155202

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 456

View: 903

In a candid memoir, the former first lady discusses the frantic and fearful months after 9/11, her trip to Afghanistan, her advocacy on behalf of women in oppressed countries, her love of libraries, what really happens in the White House and much more, in a book with 24 pages of full-color photos.

Legendary Locals of Cleveland

Legendary Locals of Cleveland chronicles the fascinating stories of citizens who have impacted the city in political, social, philanthropic, business, educational, scientific/medical, entertainment, and even criminal areas."

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Author: Thea Gallo Becker

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467100298

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 225

In 1796, when Gen. Moses Cleaveland founded the settlement on Lake Erie's shores that would become the city of Cleveland, he opened the way for many dynamic, visionary, and diverse individuals who would not only help Cleveland prosper as one of the greatest cities in the Midwest, but also give the city its unique character. Mobster Danny Greene's fate was sealed by a car bomb and his life was later immortalized in film. Vernon Stouffer helped revolutionize the frozen food industry and the way Americans eat. Almeda Adams refused to let her disability keep her from making contributions in education and music. And Zelma Watson George found success in theater and, later, politics as a goodwill ambassador and a delegate to the United Nations. Legendary Locals of Cleveland chronicles the fascinating stories of citizens who have impacted the city in political, social, philanthropic, business, educational, scientific/medical, entertainment, and even criminal areas.

Berea

Among southwest Cleveland suburbs, Berea, a community of 19,000, is unique. Berea was once called "The Sandstone Capital of the World," but the area's quarrying industry ceased in the mid-20th century.

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Author: Patricia M. Mote

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439650066

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 353

Among southwest Cleveland suburbs, Berea, a community of 19,000, is unique. Berea was once called "The Sandstone Capital of the World," but the area's quarrying industry ceased in the mid-20th century. Immigrant quarrymen and their descendants remained, adding an eclectic and resilient mix to the academic atmosphere. Where blasting once shook the quarries, a pleasant area of lakes, trails, and picnic spots now delights residents and visitors alike. The historic home of the town's first doctor enjoys new life as a bed-and-breakfast, contemporary architecture integrates a historic church as part of the university, a wind turbine generates power for the fairgrounds, and community gardens offer produce to local food pantries.

Berea

Today , Berea is a unique Cleveland suburb . Baldwin University and German Wallace ... The Images of America series celebrates the history of neighborhoods , towns , and cities across the country . Using archival photographs , each ...

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Author: Patricia M. Mote

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738533300

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 722

Quarrying was a major industry from roughly 1850 to 1950 in Berea, attracting large numbers of immigrants in search of work. Baldwin Institute and University (1846) and German Wallace College (1863) created an academic atmosphere, and Berea's citizens became an eclectic and resilient mix of academics, business people, and immigrants. Eventually, quarrying ended, and the downtown business district, the Triangle, was nearly destroyed by fire three times. Each time the determined residents of Berea rebuilt. Today, Berea is a unique Cleveland suburb. Baldwin University and German Wallace College merged, and the south side of town has been devoted to recreation by the Cleveland Metroparks System and the City of Berea. The largest quarry became Coe Lake, a site for fishing, canoeing, art fairs, concerts, and ice-skating. Coffee shops, boutiques, and art galleries now thrive in old livery stables, icehouses, and hardware stores. Many of the grand homes of the 19th century still stand, proudly boasting their bronze "Century Home" plaques.

Old Brooklyn

Gustave Ruetenik & Sons introduced greenhouse gardening on Schaaf Road in 1887, giving the area the title "Greenhouse Capital of the United States." Old Brooklyn also became home to the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo in 1916.

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Author: Historical Society of Old Brooklyn

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467111928

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 411

Old Brooklyn was originally settled in 1814 as the hamlet of Brighton. Indian trails were the basis for what became Pearl, Broadview, and Schaaf Roads. Brighton Village, centered around what is now the intersection of Pearl and Broadview Roads, was incorporated for one year in 1838. Brighton was originally laid out on land belonging to a farmer named Warren Young. Another incorporation in 1889 renamed the village South Brooklyn, and it was then annexed by the City of Cleveland in 1905 because of its light plant. Gustave Ruetenik & Sons introduced greenhouse gardening on Schaaf Road in 1887, giving the area the title "Greenhouse Capital of the United States." Old Brooklyn also became home to the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo in 1916.