Confrontation at Gettysburg

Join historian John Hoptak as he narrates the fierce action between the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and the Union Army of the Potomac at such places as McPherson's Ridge, the Railroad Cut, the Wheatfield, the Peach Orchard, Devil ...

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Author: John David Hoptak

Publisher: History Press

ISBN: 1609494261

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 637

Gettysburg is America's most famous battle. Fought on the first three days of July 1863, it was one of the largest and by far the bloodiest of the Civil War. Yet the importance of this great conflagration cannot be measured in numbers alone, for Gettysburg also represented a pivotal moment in the war. The battle ended General Robert E. Lee's second invasion of Union soil, and never again did a Confederate army reach that far north. Join historian John Hoptak as he narrates the fierce action between the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and the Union Army of the Potomac at such places as McPherson's Ridge, the Railroad Cut, the Wheatfield, the Peach Orchard, Devil's Den, Little Round Top and on Culp's and Cemetery Hills.

Confrontation at Gettysburg

During the postwar years, with the history of the conflict already fast becoming obscured by hindsight and clouded by nostalgia, the Battle of Gettysburg ...

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Author: John David Hoptak

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781614237815

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 842

Gettysburg is America's most famous battle. Fought on the first three days of July 1863, it was one of the largest and by far the bloodiest of the Civil War. Yet the importance of this great conflagration cannot be measured in numbers alone, for Gettysburg also represented a pivotal moment in the war. The battle ended General Robert E. Lee's second invasion of Union soil, and never again did a Confederate army reach that far north. Join historian John Hoptak as he narrates the fierce action between the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and the Union Army of the Potomac at such places as McPherson's Ridge, the Railroad Cut, the Wheatfield, the Peach Orchard, Devil's Den, Little Round Top and on Culp's and Cemetery Hills.

Gettysburg

... marching obliquely away from what seemed a likely confrontation at Gettysburg.23 As June ended and the two great armies steadily closed on each other, ...

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Author: Stephen W. Sears

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547526849

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 257

The greatest of all Civil War campaigns, Gettysburg was the turning point of the turning point in our nation’s history. Volumes have been written about this momentous three-day battle, but recent histories have tended to focus on the particulars rather than the big picture: on the generals or on single days of battle—even on single charges—or on the daily lives of the soldiers. In Gettysburg Sears tells the whole story in a single volume. From the first gleam in Lee’s eye to the last Rebel hightailing it back across the Potomac, every moment of the battle is brought to life with the vivid narrative skill and impeccable scholarship that has made Stephen Sears’s other histories so successful. Based on years of research, this is the first book in a generation that brings everything together, sorts it all out, makes informed judgments, and takes stands. Even the most knowledgeable of Civil War buffs will find fascinating new material and new interpretations, and Sears’s famously accessible style will make the book just as appealing to the general reader. In short, this is the one book on Gettysburg that anyone interested in the Civil War should own.

Three Days at Gettysburg

The first , written en route to Gettysburg , is dated June 25 , 1863 , at ... a statement of an offensive grand strategy , whether the confrontation at the ...

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Author: Gary W. Gallagher

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 0873386299

Category: History

Page: 373

View: 992

A collection of essays from Civil War historians on leadership during the three-day Battle of Gettysburg. Based on manuscript sources and consideration of existing literature, the contributors challenge prevailing interpretations of key officers' performances.

South Carolinians in the Battle of Gettysburg

Montgomery, a native of Lancaster County, South Carolina, was a corporal, fought at Gettysburg and was wounded three times during the conflict.

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Author: Derek Smith

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476642758

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 402

July 1, 1863. The Confederate Army of Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee advanced across the Pennsylvania countryside toward the small town of Gettysburg--less than 90 miles from Washington, D.C.--on a collision course with the Union Army of the Potomac. In Lee's ranks were 5,000 South Carolina troops destined to play critical roles in the three days of fighting ahead. From generals to privates, the Palmetto State soldiers were hurled into the Civil War's most famous battle--hundreds were killed, wounded or later suffered as prisoners of war. The life-and-death stories of these South Carolinians are here woven together here with official wartime reports, previously unpublished letters, newspaper accounts, diaries and the author's personal observations from walking the battlefield.

The First Day at Gettysburg

It is therefore a statement of an offensive grand strategy , whether the confrontation at the " point of concentration " was to take the form of the ...

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Author: Gary W. Gallagher

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 0873384571

Category: History

Page: 174

View: 895

Many writers have argued that the Battle of Gettysburg represented the turning point of the Civil War, after which the Confederate fortunes moved inexorably toward defeat. Often overshadowed by more famous events on the second and third day, the initial phase of the contest offers very interesting problems of leadership.

Victory at Gettysburg

Even after visiting the battlefield four times in the years following Appomattox, ... of where some of the crucial events in his historic confrontation with ...

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Author: Glenn W. LaFantasie

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253011930

Category: History

Page: 79

View: 858

The Civil War generation saw its world in ways startlingly different from our own. Glenn W. LaFantasie examines the lives and experiences of several key personalities who gained fame during the war. As a turning point in the war, Gettysburg had a different effect on each person.Victory at Gettysburg captures the human drama of the war and shows how this group of individuals endured or succumbed to the war and, willingly or unwillingly, influenced its outcome. At the same time, it shows how the war shaped the lives of these individuals, putting them through ordeals they never dreamed they would face or survive. The battle of Gettysburg is the thread that ties these Civil War lives together.

We Were There at the Battle of Gettysburg

Expert-approved, illustrated novel unfolds in a small Pennsylvania town, where Confederate and Union troops converge for a decisive confrontation.

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Author: Alida Sims Malkus

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486782461

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 192

View: 280

Expert-approved, illustrated novel unfolds in a small Pennsylvania town, where Confederate and Union troops converge for a decisive confrontation. A dramatic series of adventures features cameos by Lee, Lincoln, and other historical figures.

Custer at Gettysburg

A New Look at George Armstrong Custer versus Jeb Stuart in the Battle's Climactic ... to protect an army's flank with cavalry during a major confrontation.

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Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780811768924

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 727

George Armstrong Custer is famous for his fatal defeat at the Little Bighorn in 1876, but Custer’s baptism of fire came during the Civil War. After graduating last in the West Point class of 1861, Custer served from the First Battle of Bull Run (only a month after graduation) through Appomattox, where he witnessed the surrender. But Custer’s true rise to prominence began at Gettysburg in 1863. On the eve of the Battle of Gettysburg, only twenty-three years old and barely two years removed from being the goat of his West Point class, Custer received promotion to brigadier general and command – his first direct field command – of the Michigan Cavalry Brigade, the “Wolverines.” Now that he held general rank, Custer felt comfortable wearing the distinctive, some said gaudy, uniform that helped skyrocket him into fame and legend. However flashy he may have been in style, Custer did not disappoint his superiors, who promoted him in a search for more aggressive cavalry officers. At approximately noon on July 3, 1863, Custer and his men heard enemy cannon fire: Stuart’s signal to Lee that he was ready for action. Thus began the melee that was East Cavalry Field at Gettysburg. Much back and forth preceded Custer’s career-defining action. An hour or two into the battle, after many of his cavalrymen had been reduced to hand-to-hand infantry-style fighting, Custer ordered a charge of one of his regiments and led it into action himself, screaming one of the battle’s most famous lines: “Come on, you Wolverines!” Around three o’clock, Stuart mounted a final charge, which mowed down Union cavalry – until it ran into Custer’s Wolverines, who stood firm, with Custer wielding a sword at their head, and broke the Confederates’ last attack. In a book combining two popular subjects, Tucker recounts the story of Custer at Gettysburg with verve, shows how the Custer legend was born on the fields of the war’s most famous battle, and offers eye-opening new perspectives on Gettysburg’s overlooked cavalry battle.

The Maps of the Cavalry at Gettysburg

The first effort in 2007 resulted in The Maps of Gettysburg, which served as a ... the Wilderness fight and headed to the confrontation at Spotsylvania, ...

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Author: Bradley M. Gottfried

Publisher: Savas Beatie

ISBN: 9781611214802

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 702

The Maps of the Cavalry in the Gettysburg Campaign: An Atlas of Mounted Operations from Brandy Station Through Falling Waters, June 9 - July 14, 1863 continues Bradley M. Gottfried’s efforts to study and illustrate the major campaigns of the Civil War’s Eastern Theater. This is his seventh book in the ongoing Savas Beatie Military Atlas Series. The Maps of Gettysburg, Gottfried’s inaugural and groundbreaking atlas published in 2007, covered only a small portion of the cavalry’s actions during the seminal campaign. This book addresses that topic in-depth in a way that no other study has ever achieved. Gottfried covers the opening battle of the campaign at Brandy Station in detail, followed by the actions at Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville, where Jeb Stuart’s cavalry successfully halted Alfred Pleasonton’s probes toward the Blue Mountain passes in an effort to determine the location of Robert E. Lee’s army. The movements toward Gettysburg are covered in a series of maps, including the actions at Westminister, Hanover, and Hunterstown. The five major actions on July 2-3 at Gettysburg take up a considerable portion of the book and include the fight at Brinkerhoff Ridge, and four more on July 3 (Stuart against David Gregg northeast of the town, Wesley Merritt’s fight along Emmitsburg Road, Judson Kilpatrick’s actions near the base of Big Round Top, and Grumble Jones’s near-destruction of the 6th U.S. Cavalry near Fairfield). The cavalry also played a vital role during Lee’s retreat to the Potomac River. The numerous fights at Monterrey Pass, Smithfield, Boonsboro, Funkstown, and Hagerstown were of critical importance to both sides and are covered in detail. The book concludes with the fight at Falling Waters and ends with an epilogue recounting events occurring in Virginia through the end of July. The Maps of the Cavalry in the Gettysburg Campaign plows new ground by breaking down the entire campaign into sixteen map sets or “action sections,” enriched with 82 detailed full-page color maps. These cartographic originals bore down to the regimental and battery level, and include the march to and from the battlefield and virtually every significant event in between. At least two—and as many as ten—maps accompany each map set. Keyed to each piece of cartography is a full-facing page of detailed text describing the units, personalities, movements, and combat (including quotes from eyewitnesses) depicted on the accompanying map, all of which make the cavalry actions come alive. This presentation allows readers to easily and quickly find a map and text on virtually any portion of the campaign. Serious students will appreciate the extensive and authoritative endnotes and complete order of battle, and take it with them on trips to the battlefields. A final bonus is that the maps unlock every other book or article written on any aspect of the cavalry’s actions during this important campaign. Perfect for the easy chair or for stomping the hallowed grounds, The Maps of the Cavalry in the Gettysburg Campaign is a seminal work that belongs on the bookshelf of every serious and casual student of the battle.

The Irish at Gettysburg

Displaying excessive martial qualities and aggressiveness on the ... blow to McClellan's army on July 1, 1862, during the last bloody confrontation of the ...

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Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker PhD

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439664186

Category: Photography

Page: 240

View: 913

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Irish citizens on both sides of the Mason-Dixon answered the call to arms. That was no more evident than at the Battle of Gettysburg. Louisiana Irish Rebels charged with the cry "We are the Louisiana Tigers!" Irish soldiers of the Alabama Brigade and the Texas Brigade launched assaults on the line's southern end at Little Round Top. During Pickett's Charge, Gaelic brothers fought each other as determined Irishmen of the Sixty-Ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry repelled Irish of the Virginia Brigade in one of the most decisive moments in American history. Author Phillip Thomas Tucker reveals the compelling story.

Gettysburg Culp s Hill and Cemetery Hill

“hazard a general battle”; he was committed to a major confrontation at Gettysburg.” After their conversation with Meade, Slocum and Sickles left Cemetery ...

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Author: Harry W. Pfanz

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807869741

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 339

In this companion to his celebrated earlier book, Gettysburg--The Second Day, Harry Pfanz provides the first definitive account of the fighting between the Army of the Potomac and Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Cemetery Hill and Culp's Hill--two of the most critical engagements fought at Gettysburg on 2 and 3 July 1863. Pfanz provides detailed tactical accounts of each stage of the contest and explores the interactions between--and decisions made by--generals on both sides. In particular, he illuminates Confederate lieutenant general Richard S. Ewell's controversial decision not to attack Cemetery Hill after the initial southern victory on 1 July. Pfanz also explores other salient features of the fighting, including the Confederate occupation of the town of Gettysburg, the skirmishing in the south end of town and in front of the hills, the use of breastworks on Culp's Hill, and the small but decisive fight between Union cavalry and the Stonewall Brigade.

Fury on the Bliss Farm at Gettysburg

The struggle that engulfed William Bliss' property during the battle at Gettysburg had its seeds in the bloody confrontation that began nearby on July 1, ...

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Author: John M. Archer

Publisher: Savas Publishing

ISBN: 9780983721390

Category: History

Page: 78

View: 799

The odd grassy mound between the long ridges south of Gettysburg might arouse the curiosity of a visitor, but the site of the Bliss Farm lies hundreds of yards from modern tour routs. Certainly, more infamous sites on the battlefield vie for one’s attention, and the struggle fro this once prosperous homestead is easily overlooked. Yet, on July 2 & 3, 1863, the incongruously named farm was a no-man’s land that changed hands some ten times – possibly more than any other ground at Gettysburg. The reader is invited to tour this seldom explored area of the battlefield using maps, photos, and first-hand accounts to discover how that struggle impacted Lee’s plan for victory, the lives of those who fought there, and the Bliss family.

Irrepressible Conflict The Cause of the American Civil War

The Civil War resulted from the insistence of Southern firebrands that the 1820 restrictions on where slavery could be practiced in the Western territories of the USA be removed.

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Author: Stanley M. Harmon

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781491899595

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 998

The Civil War resulted from the insistence of Southern “firebrands” that the 1820 restrictions on where slavery could be practiced in the Western territories of the USA be removed. And the dogged determination of some Northerners to restrict the brutal treatment of blacks and finally put slavery on the road to extinction. In the 1850’s big shoes dropped one after another in staccato fashion to dash such hopes. The final straws were the Dred Scott Decision in 1857 saying blacks weren’t even people and Congress had no power to restrict slavery anywhere ! And Civil War was going on in “bleeding Kansas” between adherents of the two stances. John Brown was radicalized there by the sacking of Abolitionist stronghold Lawrence. He and his sons killed some Jayhawkers (slavery adherents) from Missouri. Then Brown, his sons, and a few others, lit a fuse in Oct 1859 by a hare brained scheme to seize the Federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry to arm slaves and precipitate action to free them. So when Lincoln was elected in 1860—the South bolted! As they had threatened for 15 years. America was almost destroyed. Until July 4, 1863 when two Union victories insured: “that these honored dead (800,000) shall not have died in vain” Abraham Lincoln Gettysburg, Pa Nov. 1863.

The Illustrated Gettysburg Reader

An Eyewitness History of the Civil WarÕs Greatest Battle Rod Gragg ... of. the. enemy”. A Confrontation Develops at Gettysburg ...

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Author: Rod Gragg

Publisher: Regnery Publishing

ISBN: 9781621570431

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 399

Examines the Battle of Gettysburg through letters, journals, articles, and speeches from the people who lived through those days.

The 100 Best Affordable Vacations

IIIIIIIItIIIIIIIIIIIItIIIQIIIIIIIIQIIIUIIIIOI CONFRONTATION AT GETTYSBURG Less than 90 years after the Battles of Lexington and Concord, another revolution ...

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Author: Jane Wooldridge

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 9781426207396

Category: Travel

Page: 288

View: 515

Even in a weakened economy, research shows interest in travel is still strong and this book provides 100 great ways to satisfy your wanderlust without breaking the bank. Like the other books in this popular series, The 100 Best Affordable Vacations to Enrich Your Life features out of the ordinary opportunities. They will just be less expensive, with some even free! Vacation categories include Classic Americana; Learning Vacations; Wilderness Trips; and Mind, Body, and Soul themed getaways. With this mix, there are lots of creative ideas and appealing destinations for everybody, whatever their interests, schedule, or budget. This book also offers profiles of inspirational travelers, as well as fun, lively sidebars about off-season travel, how to be a traveler and not a tourist, and more.

Plenty of Blame to go Around

Coddington's statement that Meade was “just as surprised” as Lee of the confrontation at Gettysburg is not entirely accurate. Though uncertain as to the ...

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Author: Eric Wittenberg

Publisher: Savas Beatie

ISBN: 9781611210170

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 814

June 1863. The Gettysburg Campaign is in its opening hours. Harness jingles and hoofs pound as Confederate cavalryman James Ewell Brown (JEB) Stuart leads his three brigades of veteran troopers on a ride that triggers one of the Civil War’s most bitter and enduring controversies. Instead of finding glory and victory—two objectives with which he was intimately familiar—Stuart reaped stinging criticism and substantial blame for one of the Confederacy’s most stunning and unexpected battlefield defeats. In Plenty of Blame to Go Around: Jeb Stuart’s Controversial Ride to Gettysburg, Eric J. Wittenberg and J. David Petruzzi objectively investigate the role Stuart’s horsemen played in the disastrous campaign. It is the first book ever written on this important and endlessly fascinating subject. Stuart left Virginia under acting on General Robert E. Lee’s discretionary orders to advance into Maryland and Pennsylvania, where he was to screen Lt. Gen. Richard Ewell’s marching infantry corps and report on enemy activity. The mission jumped off its tracks from virtually the moment it began when one unexpected event after another unfolded across Stuart's path. For days, neither Lee nor Stuart had any idea where the other was, and the enemy blocked the horseman’s direct route back to the Confederate army, which was advancing nearly blind north into Pennsylvania. By the time Stuart reached Lee on the afternoon of July 2, the armies had unexpectedly collided at Gettysburg, the second day's fighting was underway, and one of the campaign’s greatest controversies was born. Did the plumed cavalier disobey Lee’s orders by stripping the army of its “eyes and ears?” Was Stuart to blame for the unexpected combat the broke out at Gettysburg on July 1? Authors Wittenberg and Petruzzi, widely recognized for their study and expertise of Civil War cavalry operations, have drawn upon a massive array of primary sources, many heretofore untapped, to fully explore Stuart’s ride, its consequences, and the intense debate among participants shortly after the battle, through early post-war commentators, and among modern scholars. The result is a richly detailed study jammed with incisive tactical commentary, new perspectives on the strategic role of the Southern cavalry, and fresh insights on every horse engagement, large and small, fought during the campaign. About the authors: Eric J. Wittenberg has written widely on Civil War cavalry operations. His books include Glory Enough for All (2002), The Union Cavalry Comes of Age (2003), and The Battle of Monroe’s Crossroads and the Civil War’s Final Campaign (2005). He lives in Columbus, Ohio. J. David Petruzzi is the author of several magazine articles on Eastern Theater cavalry operations, conducts tours of cavalry sites of the Gettysburg Campaign, and is the author of the popular “Buford’s Boys” website at www.bufordsboys.com. Petruzzi lives in Brockway, Pennsylvania.

Barksdale s Charge

toward Gettysburg, a rendezvous with destiny, and the grim killing fields of summer.107 The dramatic confrontation at Gettysburg continued unabated on July ...

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Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Casemate

ISBN: 9781612001791

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 416

On the third day of Gettysburg, Robert E. Lee launched a magnificent attack. For pure pageantry it was unsurpassed, and it also marked the centerpiece of the war, both time-wise and in terms of how the conflict had turned a cornerÑfrom persistent Confederate hopes to impending Rebel despair. But PickettÕs Charge was crushed by the Union defenders that day, having never had a chance in the first place. The ConfederacyÕs real Òhigh tideÓ at Gettysburg had come the afternoon before, during the swirling conflagration when LongstreetÕs corps first entered the battle, when the Federals just barely held on. The foremost Rebel spearhead on that second day of the battle was BarksdaleÕs Mississippi brigade, which launched what one (Union) observer called the "grandest charge that was ever seen by mortal man.Ó BarksdaleÕs brigade was already renowned in the Army of Northern Virginia for its stand-alone fights at Fredericksburg. On the second day of Gettysburg it was just champing at the bit to go in. The Federal left was not as vulnerable as Lee had envisioned, but had cooperated with Rebel wishes by extending its Third Corps into a salient. HoodÕs crack division was launched first, seizing DevilÕs Den, climbing Little Round Top, and hammering in the wheatfield. Then Longstreet began to launch McLawsÕ division, and finally gave Barksdale the go-ahead. The Mississippians, with their white-haired commander on horseback at their head, utterly crushed the peach orchard salient and continued marauding up to Cemetery Ridge. Hancock, Meade, and other Union generals desperately struggled to find units to stem the Rebel tide. One of BarksdaleÕs regiments, the 21st Mississippi, veered off from the brigade in the chaos, rampaging across the field, overrunning Union battery after battery. The collapsing Federals had to gather men from four different corps to try to stem the onslaught. Barksdale himself was killed at the apex of his advance. Darkness, as well as Confederate exhaustion, finally ended the dayÕs fight as the shaken, depleted Federal units on their heights took stock. They had barely held on against the full ferocity of the Rebels, on a day that decided the fate of the nation. BarksdaleÕs Charge describes the exact moment when the Confederacy reached its zenith, and the soldiers of the Northern states just barely succeeded in retaining their perfect Union. Phillip Thomas Tucker, Ph.D. Has authored or edited over 20 books on various aspects of the American experience, especially in the fields of Civil War, Irish, African-American, Revolutionary, and Southern history. A native of St. Louis, Missouri, he has earned three degrees in American history, including a Ph.D. From St. Louis University in 1990. For over two decades, Dr. Tucker served as a military historian for the U.S. Air Force. He currently lives in the vicinity of Washington, DC.

Culp s Hill at Gettysburg

The heavily wooded slopes of CulpÕs Hill do not easily lend themselves to visions of long, gallant lines of charging infantry as do other areas on the battlefield at Gettysburg.

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Author: John M. Archer

Publisher: Savas Publishing

ISBN: 9781940669243

Category: History

Page: 156

View: 568

The heavily wooded slopes of CulpÕs Hill do not easily lend themselves to visions of long, gallant lines of charging infantry as do other areas on the battlefield at Gettysburg. But the regimental monuments and traces of breastworks that line the slopes of CulpÕs Hill bear silent testament to a hellish conflict: no other spot at Gettysburg would see such a sustained period of brutal combat as when North and South vied for this ground. The reader is invited to tour this seldom explored segment of the battle using maps, photos, and first-hand accounts to help understand the unique character of the struggle for CulpÕs Hill and the men who fought for its slopes.

The Devil s Advocates

Meanwhile, the war raged on, and in 1863 both sides were preparing for a confrontation at Gettysburg. Sickles, now a major general, was to play a key role ...

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Author: Michael S Lief

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781416571865

Category: Law

Page: 448

View: 559

From the authors of the acclaimed Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, and featuring some of the most important cases in criminal law, The Devil's Advocates is the final volume of a must-have trilogy of the best closing arguments in American legal history. Criminal law is considered by many to be the most exciting of the legal specialties, and here the authors turn to the type of dramatic crimes and trials that have so captivated the public -- becoming fodder for countless television shows and legal thrillers. But the eight cases in this collection have also set historical precedents and illuminated underlying principles of the American criminal justice system. Future president John Adams makes clear that even the most despised and vilified criminal is entitled to a legal defense in the argument he delivers on behalf of the British soldiers who shot and killed five Americans during the Boston Massacre. The always-controversial temporary-insanity defense makes its debut within sight of the White House when, in front of horrified onlookers, a prominent congressman guns down the district attorney over an extramarital affair. Clarence Darrow provides a ringing defense of a black family charged with using deadly force to defend themselves from a violent mob -- an argument that refines the concept of self-defense and its applicability to all races. The treason trial of Aaron Burr, accused of plotting to "steal" the western territories of the United States and form a new country with himself as its head, offers a fascinating glimpse into a rare type of prosecution, as well as a look at one of the most interesting traitors in the nation's history. Perhaps the best-known case in the book is that of Ernesto Miranda, the accused rapist whose trial led to the Supreme Court decision requiring police to advise suspects of their rights to remain silent and to have an attorney present -- their Miranda rights. Each of the eight cases presented here is given legal and cultural context, including a brief historical introduction, a biographical sketch of the attorneys involved, highlights of trial testimony, analysis of the closing arguments, and a summary of the trial's impact on its participants and our country. In clear, jargon-free prose, Michael S Lief and H. Mitchell Caldwell make these pivotal cases come to vibrant life for every reader.