Disability and the Tudors

disability was very much an included part of royal life. Disabled people then, like today, were found in all aspects of Tudor society and therefore their inclusion and relevance are a vital component in our developmental history, ...

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Author: Phillipa Vincent Connolly

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 9781526720085

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 526

Throughout history, how society treated its disabled and infirm can tell us a great deal about the period. Challenged with any impairment, disease or frailty was often a matter of life and death before the advent of modern medicine, so how did a society support the disabled amongst them? For centuries, disabled people and their history have been overlooked - hidden in plain sight. Very little on the infirm and mentally ill was written down during the renaissance period. The Tudor period is no exception and presents a complex, unparalleled story. The sixteenth century was far from exemplary in the treatment of its infirm, but a multifaceted and ambiguous story emerges, where society’s ‘natural fools’ were elevated as much as they were belittled. Meet characters like William Somer, Henry VIII’s fool at court, whom the king depended upon, and learn of how the dissolution of the monasteries contributed to forming an army of ‘sturdy beggars’ who roamed Tudor England without charitable support. From the nobility to the lowest of society, Phillipa Vincent-Connolly casts a light on the lives of disabled people in Tudor England and guides us through the social, religious, cultural, and ruling classes’ response to disability as it was then perceived.

Disability and the Tudors

From the nobility to the lowest of society, Phillipa Vincent-Connolly casts a light on the lives of disabled people in Tudor England and guides us through the social, religious, cultural, and ruling classes’ response to disability as it ...

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Author: Phillipa Vincent Connolly

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 9781526720078

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 130

Throughout history, how society treated its disabled and infirm can tell us a great deal about the period. Challenged with any impairment, disease or frailty was often a matter of life and death before the advent of modern medicine, so how did a society support the disabled amongst them? For centuries, disabled people and their history have been overlooked - hidden in plain sight. Very little on the infirm and mentally ill was written down during the renaissance period. The Tudor period is no exception and presents a complex, unparalleled story. The sixteenth century was far from exemplary in the treatment of its infirm, but a multifaceted and ambiguous story emerges, where society’s ‘natural fools’ were elevated as much as they were belittled. Meet characters like William Somer, Henry VIII’s fool at court, whom the king depended upon, and learn of how the dissolution of the monasteries contributed to forming an army of ‘sturdy beggars’ who roamed Tudor England without charitable support. From the nobility to the lowest of society, Phillipa Vincent-Connolly casts a light on the lives of disabled people in Tudor England and guides us through the social, religious, cultural, and ruling classes’ response to disability as it was then perceived.

Disability in the Middle Ages

... the Tudor Dynasty and Shakespeare's original audience, by comparison, could see their government as effective and physically harmonious because it was not ill supported on a hunched back. In a sense then, Shakespeare constructs ...

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Author: Joshua R. Eyler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317150190

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 321

What do we mean when we talk about disability in the Middle Ages? This volume brings together dynamic scholars working on the subject in medieval literature and history, who use the latest approaches from the field to address this central question. Contributors discuss such standard medieval texts as the Arthurian Legend, The Canterbury Tales and Old Norse Sagas, providing an accessible entry point to the field of medieval disability studies to medievalists. The essays explore a wide variety of disabilities, including the more traditionally accepted classifications of blindness and deafness, as well as perceived disabilities such as madness, pregnancy and age. Adopting a ground-breaking new approach to the study of disability in the medieval period, this provocative book will interest medievalists and scholars of disability throughout history.

Brothers and Sisters of Disabled Children

... an individual whose twisted humped back was in reality a deformity invented by the Tudors to discredit his name . ... Living with disability may make a family feel isolated and alone , especially if social encounters reinforce the ...

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Author: Peter Burke

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

ISBN: 1843100436

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 159

View: 519

Examining the overlooked subject of non-disabled siblings in families where there is a disabled child, this book details the experiences of these children and explores what it means to them to have a disabled brother or sister. The author makes clear recommendations for future practice.

The Private Lives of the Tudors

... most court fools in the early Tudor period were 'natural fools', or people with learning disabilities. This was the case with Will, who had a keeper appointed to care for him. Natural fools were defined as being 'abortive of wit, ...

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Author: Tracy Borman

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781444782912

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 948

'Borman approaches her topic with huge enthusiasm and a keen eye for entertaining...this is a very human story of a remarkable family, full of vignettes that sit long in the mind.' Dan Jones, The Sunday Times 'Tracy Borman's eye for detail is impressive; the book is packed with fascinating courtly minutiae... this is a wonderful book.' The Times 'Borman is an authoritative and engaging writer, good at prising out those humanising details that make the past alive to us.' The Observer 'Fascinating, detailed account of the everyday reality of the royals... This is a book of rich scholarship.' Daily Mail 'Tracy Borman's passion for the Tudor period shines forth from the pages of this fascinatingly detailed book, which vividly illuminates what went on behind the scenes at the Tudor court.' Alison Weir 'I do not live in a corner. A thousand eyes see all I do.' Elizabeth I The Tudor monarchs were constantly surrounded by an army of attendants, courtiers and ministers. Even in their most private moments, they were accompanied by a servant specifically appointed for the task. A groom of the stool would stand patiently by as Henry VIII performed his daily purges, and when Elizabeth I retired for the evening, one of her female servants would sleep at the end of her bed. These attendants knew the truth behind the glamorous exterior. They saw the tears shed by Henry VII upon the death of his son Arthur. They knew the tragic secret behind 'Bloody' Mary's phantom pregnancies. And they saw the 'crooked carcass' beneath Elizabeth I's carefully applied makeup, gowns and accessories. It is the accounts of these eyewitnesses, as well as a rich array of other contemporary sources that historian Tracy Borman has examined more closely than ever before. With new insights and discoveries, and in the same way that she brilliantly illuminated the real Thomas Cromwell - The Private Life of the Tudors will reveal previously unexamined details about the characters we think we know so well.

The Place of the Social Margins 1350 1750

Irina Metzler, Disability in Medieval Europe: Thinking About Physical Impairment During the High Middle Ages (London, ... Under the Tudors and Stuarts (Leicester, 1974); Keith Wrightson, English Society 1580–1680 (London, 1982), pp.

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Author: Andrew Spicer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317630241

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 328

This interdisciplinary volume illuminates the shadowy history of the disadvantaged, sick and those who did not conform to the accepted norms of society. It explores how marginal identity was formed, perceived and represented in Britain and Europe during the medieval and early modern periods. It illustrates that the identities of marginal groups were shaped by their place within primarily urban communities, both in terms of their socio-economic status and the spaces in which they lived and worked. Some of these groups – such as executioners, prostitutes, pedlars and slaves – performed a significant social and economic function but on the basis of this were stigmatized by other townspeople. Language was used to control and limit the activities of others within society such as single women and foreigners, as well as the victims of sexual crimes. For many, such as lepers and the disabled, marginal status could be ambiguous, cyclical or short-lived and affected by key religious, political and economic events. Traditional histories have often considered these groups in isolation. Based on new research, a series of case studies from Britain and across Europe illustrate and provide important insights into the problems faced by these marginal groups and the ways in which medieval and early modern communities were shaped and developed.

The Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies

The ruling Tudor family had supplanted Richard III, and Shakespeare obliged them not only by depicting him as a murderer and traitor, but also by enhancing Richard's deformities. In Henry the Sixth, Part 3, which Olivier quotes several ...

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Author: Blake Howe

Publisher: Oxford Handbooks

ISBN: 9780199331444

Category: Music

Page: 928

View: 327

Disability is a broad, heterogeneous, and porous identity, and that diversity is reflected in the variety of bodily conditions under discussion here, including autism and intellectual disability, deafness, blindness, and mobility impairment often coupled with bodily deformity. Cultural Disability Studies has, from its inception, been oriented toward physical and sensory disabilities, and has generally been less effective in dealing with cognitive and intellectual impairments and with the sorts of emotions and behaviors that in our era are often medicalized as "mental illness." In that context, it is notable that so many of these essays are centrally concerned with madness, that broad and ever-shifting cultural category. There is also in impressive diversity of subject matter including YouTube videos, Ghanaian drumming, Cirque du Soleil, piano competitions, castrati, medieval smoking songs, and popular musicals. Amid this diversity of time, place, style, medium, and topic, the chapters share two core commitments.0First, they are united in their theoretical and methodological connection to Disability Studies, especially its central idea that disability is a social and cultural construction. Disability both shapes and is shaped by culture, including musical culture. Second, these essays individually and collectively make the case that disability is not something at the periphery of culture and music, but something central to our art and to our humanity.

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the Tudors but Were Afraid to Ask

The Church also helped some of those who were unable to work due to ill health or disability. Apart from criminals, others at the bottom of the social classes were the scavengers, whose job it was to clean the filthy streets of the ...

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Author: Terry Breverton

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 9781445638454

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 521

A compendium of facts, myths, and surprising secrets of the most infamous British royal family

Ireland in the Age of the Tudors 1447 1603

The ministers for disability and greediness be had in contempt, and the wise fear more the impiety of the licentious professors than the superstition of the erroneous papists.25 To remedy this situation, the administration requested ...

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Author: Steven G. Ellis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317901433

Category: History

Page: 460

View: 798

The second edition of Steven Ellis's formidable work represents not only a survey, but also a critique of traditional perspectives on the making of modern Ireland. It explores Ireland both as a frontier society divided between English and Gaelic worlds, and also as a problem of government within the wider Tudor state. This edition includes two major new chapters: the first extending the coverage back a generation, to assess the impact on English Ireland of the crisis of lordship that accompanied the Lancastrian collapse in France and England; and the second greatly extending the material on the Gaelic response to Tudor expansion.

A Plea for the Removal of Jewish Disabilities

... will now be put to its proof , severally , in the scholastic crucibles of Trent or Augsburgh , or in the furnaces of Calvin , Socinus , Simeon , and Pusey , or of the famed theosophists of the days of the Tudors and the Stuarts .

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Author: Henry Street

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0018999572

Category: Great Britain

Page: 42

View: 187