German U Boat Losses During World War II

A deep dive into the fate of German submarines lost during the Second World War. “This has to be the best reference you can find on the subject.”—Military Modelling No other publication on this subject comes even close to including ...

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Author: Axel Niestlé

Publisher: Frontline Books

ISBN: 9781473838291

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 846

A deep dive into the fate of German submarines lost during the Second World War. “This has to be the best reference you can find on the subject.”—Military Modelling No other publication on this subject comes even close to including the amount of detail provided in this book. An introduction both summarizes previous works on the subject and describes the difficulties of obtaining and verifying information from either the Germans or the Allies on U-boat losses. The main part of the book lists by hull number each U-boat’s date of commissioning, its commanding officer, and the date and port of departure for its last patrol. It also gives the date, position, and cause of loss of each submarine, with complete details on Allied units involved in the sinking, the names and ranks of their commanding officers and pilots, and the number of crew killed or rescued. An appendix neatly summarizes data on the disposition of surviving U-boats at the end of the war and provides valuable statistical data on German U-boat losses. “Highly recommended for every serious scholar of the Atlantic war, and every library in naval history and the history of the Second World War.”—The Mariner’s Mirror “The level of detail is quite impressive and this edition is the result of 16 years of further research since the first edition . . . If you are seeking data on the fate of U-Boats then this book should be your ‘first place of call’—no other book has such detailed data.”—Military Archive Research

German U boat Losses During World War II

No other publication comes even close to including the amount of detail provided in this book about individual German submarines lost in the war.

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Author: Axel Niestle

Publisher: Naval Inst Press

ISBN: UOM:39015047058725

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 334

No other publication comes even close to including the amount of detail provided in this book about individual German submarines lost in the war.

Wolf

That followed.

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Author: Jordan Vause

Publisher: Naval Inst Press

ISBN: STANFORD:36105019277230

Category: History

Page: 249

View: 966

That followed. His close examination of their lives reveals that many were extremely different from the pictures typically drawn of them. They were as varied in their thoughts and actions as other fighting men on both sides of the war. Particularly valuable is the author's use of new information in his portrayal of Karl Donitz and other prominent commanders to correct and enhance characterizations presented in earlier books. His use of personal letters and unpublished.

Operation Drumbeat

An account of Germany's little known U-boat campaign against merchant shipping along the North American Atlantic coast during the first six months of 1942. It also documents the failure of the US Navy to meet the German attack.

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Author: Michael Gannon

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780062039064

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 861

An account of Germany's little known U-boat campaign against merchant shipping along the North American Atlantic coast during the first six months of 1942. It also documents the failure of the US Navy to meet the German attack.

U Boat Emblems in World War II

In this book he keeps alive the memory of the legendary, sometimes very original and unforgotten emblems of German U-boats.

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Author: Georg Högel

Publisher: Schiffer Pub Limited

ISBN: 076430724X

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 227

View: 968

Georg Hogel, a former U-boat sailor who saw service in World War II, experienced the origin of these emblems of the U-boat service. In this book he keeps alive the memory of the legendary, sometimes very original and unforgotten emblems of German U-boats. The author has been able to collect numerous emblems, coats of arms and markings during long years of painstaking, detailed work, in memory of some 30,000 German U-boatmen, more than 80% of those who served on these boats, who were lost in the war. The brief chronicles and excerpts from first-person memoirs make the history of the German U-boats come alive in an impressive way, and documents the background of their existence. In the current edition, the newest source materials have been included, so that many hitherto unpublished emblems, coats of arms and markings are presented for the first time. AUTHOR:

Reluctant Allies

Proving that not every aspect of the world's greatest war has been covered, this book is a valuable contribution to the ever-expanding lore of the war and will be required reading for those with an interest in naval operations, global ...

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Author: Hans-Joachim Krug

Publisher: Naval Inst Press

ISBN: UOM:39015047466142

Category: History

Page: 414

View: 702

Often forgotten among the many aspects of World War II is the alliance between Germany and Japan. Because of the vast geographical separation between these two Axis nations, and because of some of very real philosophical and operational differences, the alliance was fraught with difficulty. But in the vast middle-ground of the Indian Ocean, these "reluctant allies" did come together to conduct naval operations that might well have had disastrous consequences for the Allies but for the intervention of fate and the inevitable friction of war. Captain Krug served in U-boats in that theater and in the Far East and, with the assistance of scholars of both nations, he has produced a very readable and meticulously researched account of German and Japanese naval interaction. Besides thoroughly covering--for the first time--this neglected topic, the authors provide valuable insight into the faulty mechanism of an alliance between totalitarian powers, characterized by suspicion and a reluctance to freely share information and assets. They also bring to light the difficulties--and ultimate consequences--of dealing with the megalomania and criminal intellect of Adolf Hitler, which resulted in war-crime trials for some of the participants. Proving that not every aspect of the world's greatest war has been covered, this book is a valuable contribution to the ever-expanding lore of the war and will be required reading for those with an interest in naval operations, global strategy, and international diplomacy during the period.

Silent Hunters

The profiles of six such commanders are presented in this collection of essays.

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Author: Theodore P. Savas

Publisher: Savas Publishing

ISBN: 9781940669007

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 433

When World War II erupted across Europe in 1939, Germany knew it could not hope to compete with the Royal Navy in a head-to-head naval war. Left with no viable alternatives, the U-Bootwaffe wagered everything on the submarine in a desperate attempt to sink more tonnage than the Allies could construct. Some of these "silent hunters" who slipped out of their shelters along Europe's shores to stalk their prey have enjoyed considerable recognition in the years since. While most aspects of the bitter struggle have been told and retold from both the Axis and Allied points of view, the careers of some highly effective U-boat commanders have languished in undeserved obscurity. The profiles of six such commanders are presented in this collection of essays. They include Englebert Endrass, whose spectacular career before being lost off the coast of Gibraltar is described here by his best friend and fellow ace Enrich Topp, who wrote this while on his 15th War Patrol; Karl-Friedrich Merten, who was ranked among the war's top tonnage aces; Ralph Kapitsky, whose U-615 suicidal surface-to-air battle in the Caribbean allowed many of his fellow submariners to escape into the Atlantic; Fritz Guggenberger, who sank an aircraft carrier and organized the biggest POW escape attempt in American history; Victor Oehrn, a former staff officer of Karl Dönitz's; and Heinz Eck, who was executed by the British.

United States Submarine Losses

" This important book serves as a valuable reference work, an account of the often heroic efforts of U.S. Navy submarines in World War II, and a memorial tribute to the submariners who gave their lives for their country. 1946; reprinted ...

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Author: Naval History Division

Publisher:

ISBN: 1907521380

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 441

United States submarines compiled a tremendous record of achievement during World War II, but they paid heavily for their successes. A total of 52 submarines were lost, including 48 sunk directly or indirectly by enemy action. The personnel losses - 374 officers and 3,131 operational enlisted men - represented 16 percent of the officers and 13 percent of the enlisted men in the "silent service." Although relatively meager compared to Germany's losses of 700 to 800 subs and the 128 lost by Japan, this roll call of honor was still higher than that for other types of Allied ships. Three valuable appendices list the subs lost by Germany, Japan, and Italy."United States Submarine Losses: World War II" is a ship-by-ship description of each American sub lost at sea, including as many facts as can be determined regarding the circumstances of their sinking, as well as brief accounts of the combat accomplishments of each vessel and a list of their crew members at the time of their loss. These concise vignettes cover some of the most renowned submarines of the war, such as the Tang, which in its five patrols was credited with sinking 31 Japanese ships totaling 227,800 tons and damaging two, for a total of 4,100 tons - a record unexcelled among American subs. Some ships gained fame in the Navy for other reasons, such as the five Japanese destroyers sunk by the Harder - four on one patrol - "earning the reputation of being the Submarine Force's most terrible opponent of destroyers." This important book serves as a valuable reference work, an account of the often heroic efforts of U.S. Navy submarines in World War II, and a memorial tribute to the submariners who gave their lives for their country. 1946; reprinted 1963: 248 pages, ill.

Iron Coffins

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Author: Herbert A. Werner

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015026822612

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page: 417

View: 253

U Boats at War in World War I and II

This book contains unseen photographs taken by German submarine crew and captains during each war.The World War One selection features a submariner's photos of U-25, an early German U-boat.

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Author: Jon Sutherland

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781783038671

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 144

U Boats were the scourge of the seas for Allied shipping during both World Wars almost bringing Britain to the brink of starvation on several occasions. This book contains unseen photographs taken by German submarine crew and captains during each war.The World War One selection features a submariner's photos of U-25, an early German U-boat. They belonged to WO Friedrich Pohl who served on U-boats SM-25 and SMU-33. There are many photos of the U-boat itself, crew on deck and attacks on Norwegian merchant ships with the surface gun. U-25 was launched 12 July 1913, sank a total of 21 ships, 14,126 tons and surrendered to France 23 February 1919.The World War Two photos include images from an original WW2 U Boat commander's photo album. It belonged to Kapitan Leutnant Herbert Bruninghaus. As a U Boat navigator, he served on the famous U-38 under ace Heinrich Liebe. Herbert later went on to command three U Boats of his own - U-6, U-148 and U-1059. There are also original images from a Kriegmarine officer's photo album (unfortunately unnamed). It includes photos of Commander Prien's U-47 returning to Kiel after attacks at Scapa Flow.

Final Patrol

Most have been restored and authentically equipped. Final Patrol takes a fascinating look at these subs and the personal stories of the brave sailors who lived, fought, and often died in them.

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Author: Don Keith

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101118597

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 762

During World War II, the U.S. Navy's submarine service suffered the highest casualty percentage of all the American armed forces, losing one in five submariners. But despite the odds, these underwater warriors accounted for almost 60 percent of Japanese shipping losses, and were a major factor in winning the war. 16 U.S. submarines - and one German U-Boat - that saw action during WWII are now open to the public. Most have been restored and authentically equipped. Final Patrol takes a fascinating look at these subs and the personal stories of the brave sailors who lived, fought, and often died in them. Now, visitors can climb into these cramped steel cylinders, peer through their torpedo tubes, and imagine diving under the sea - perhaps for the last time - to stalk a fanatical enemy who threatened our nation's freedom.

The Effects of the World War II Submarine Campaigns of Germany and the United States A Comparative Analysis The U Boat in the Battle of the Atlantic and the Japanese Pacific Submarine Campaign

Numerous reasons, including leadership, tactics, and technology have all been cited as causes of respective success and failure. These are all valid. Ultimately, however, both campaigns came down to wars of attrition.

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Author: U. S. Military

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 1795090693

Category: History

Page: 68

View: 531

The effectiveness of the German and United States submarine campaigns during World War II is compared by analyzing the genesis of each campaign, the commitment to each and the effort to overcome the losses imposed by submarine warfare. This comparison highlights one aspect of the strategic and operational consequences of conflict with an adversary able to build and maintain a superior industrial base in support of the military effort. This analysis places primary focus on German U-boat efforts in the Battle of the Atlantic and the U.S. submarine efforts in the Western Pacific. Ultimately, the overriding factor in the outcomes of both campaigns was the ability of the United States to produce more ships than the Germans could sink, to build more submarines than the Japanese could sink, and to sink more Japanese ships than the Japanese could build. As a result, the United States was able to sustain its' total military effort against Germany; Japan was not able to sustain its efforts in the Pacific. With the present U.S. requirement for trans-oceanic logistics for force projection, the lessons of WWII should remind us not to downplay the threat of adversarial submarines or to continue to lose the ability to muster a credible shipbuilding industry in the event of mobilization.Before commencing a military operation, War College doctrine advises review of four basic questions. First, what military condition must be produced in the theater of war or operations to achieve the strategic goal; Second, what sequence of actions is most likely to achieve that condition; Third, how should the resources of the force be applied to accomplish that sequence of actions and; finally, what is the likely cost or risk to the joint force in performing that sequence of operations. Both Germany and Japan needed to ask these questions as they sought to expand their empires through regional conflicts prior to United States' entry into World War II. Both recognized the criticality of sea lines of communications to achieve their strategic goals - Germany to defeat Britain and Japan to sustain its' own war effort and economy. Both also recognized the risks of provoking the United States into entering the war against them, yet both, when war with the United States did occur, had done little to overcome those risks. Once the United States entered the war, neither Germany of Japan could counter the U.S. industrial might economically or through direct or indirect military efforts. The submarine campaign that the United States carried out in the Pacific against Japan was instrumental in bringing Japan to defeat. Germany's U-boat campaign in the Atlantic against U.S. and Allied shipping was thwarted. Numerous reasons, including leadership, tactics, and technology have all been cited as causes of respective success and failure. These are all valid. Ultimately, however, both campaigns came down to wars of attrition. When the final counts are analyzed, the U.S. simply built more merchant ships than the German U-boats could sink; U.S. submarines sank more merchant ships than the Japanese could build and built more submarines than the Japanese could sink.

Submarines and the World Wars

" Submarines and the World Wars: The History of Submarine Warfare in World War I and World War II analyzes the underwater fighting during both great conflicts.

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Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1986043568

Category:

Page: 144

View: 984

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of fighting *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Submarine warfare began tentatively during the American Civil War (though the Netherlands and England made small prototypes centuries earlier, and the American sergeant Ezra Lee piloted the one-man "Turtle" vainly against HMS Eagle near New York in 1776). Robert Whitehead's invention of the torpedo introduced the weapon later used most frequently by submarines. Steady improvements to Whitehead's design led to the military torpedoes deployed against shipping during both World Wars. During World War I, German U-boats operated solo except on one occasion. Initially, the British and nations supplying England with food and materiel scattered vessels singly across the ocean, making them vulnerable to the lone submarines. However, widespread late war re-adoption of the convoy system tipped the odds in the surface ships' favor, as one U-boat skipper described: "The oceans at once became bare and empty; for long periods at a time the U-boats, operating individually, would see nothing at all; and then suddenly up would loom a huge concourse of ships, thirty or fifty or more of them, surrounded by a strong escort of warships of all types." (Blair, 1996, 55). World War I proved the value of submarines, ensuring their widespread employment in the next conflict, but by using U-boats against the shipping that kept Britain supplied, it might have ultimately cost Germany and Austria-Hungary the war by providing a reason for President Woodrow Wilson to bring the United States into the struggle. One critical innovation in World War II's Atlantic U-boat operations consisted of wolf-pack tactics, in which Admiral Karl Dönitz put great faith: "The greater the number of U-boats that could be brought simultaneously into the attack, the more favourable would become the opportunities offered to each individual attacker. [...] it was obvious that, on strategic and general tactical grounds, attacks on convoys must be carried out by a number of U-boats acting in unison." (Dönitz, 1990, 4). However, even the wolf-pack proved insufficient to defeat the Atlantic convoys and stop Allied commerce - the precise opposite of the Pacific theater, where America's excellent submarine forces annihilated much of Japan's merchant marine and inflicted severe damage on the Imperial Japanese Navy. Submarines exercised a decisive impact on the outcome of the Pacific Theater in World War II. The U.S. submarine fleet, largely though not exclusively under the overall command of Vice Admiral Charles Lockwood, strangled the supply lines and shipping traffic of the Empire of Japan. Their commerce raiding crippled both Japan's ability to keep its frontline units supplied and to manufacture the weapons, vessels, and vehicles needed to successfully carry on the struggle. Though constituting only 1.6% of the total U.S. Navy's tonnage in the Pacific, the submarine fleet inflicted massive losses on the Imperial Japanese Navy and Japan's crucial merchant marine. Submarines sank 55% of the merchant shipping lost, or approximately 1,300 vessels; overall, the Allies sank 77% of Japan's shipping. The submarines also sank 214 Japanese warships, including 82 of 1,000 tons or more - 4 carriers, 4 escort carriers, one battleship, 4 heavy cruisers, 9 light cruisers, 38 destroyers, and 23 submarines - or approximately 30% of the entire Imperial Japanese Navy. The sleek, predatory craft made in the shipyards of Virginia, Wisconsin, or Washington state devastated the naval and freighter assets of the Empire of the Rising Sun out of all proportion to their numbers, at a cost of 42 submarines on "Eternal Patrol." Submarines and the World Wars: The History of Submarine Warfare in World War I and World War II analyzes the underwater fighting during both great conflicts.

Allied Submarine Attacks of World War Two

In this authoritative reference work, naval expert Jurgen Rohwer documents the Allied submarine attacks against warships and merchant ships in the European Theatre during World War Two.

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Author: Jürgen Rohwer

Publisher: Naval Inst Press

ISBN: UOM:39015041755219

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 476

Arranged by sea areas and in chronological order, this informative study contains reports of the attacks by Soviet submarines in the Baltic and Black Seas, and the attacks by British and other Allied submarines from Norway to Morocco, including the Mediterranean. This information has been compiled by the renowned German naval historian Jürgen Rohwer, with assistance from experts in Great Britain, France, Poland, Norway, the Netherlands, Italy, Greece, Russia, Finland, Sweden, Turkey, the United States, and Japan. The work not only confirms assessments from earlier publications, but corrects many wartime reports based on insufficient or incorrect observations and claims.

The Japanese Submarine Force and World War II

When first published in 1995, this book was hailed as an absolutely indispensable contribution to the history of the Pacific War.

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Author: Carl Boyd

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 9781612512068

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 858

When first published in 1995, this book was hailed as an absolutely indispensable contribution to the history of the Pacific War. Drawing heavily from Japanese sources and American wartime intercepts of secret Japanese radio messages, a noted American naval historian and a Japanese mariner painstakingly recorded and evaluated a diverse array of material about Japan's submarines in World War II. The study begins with the development of the first Japanese 103-ton Holland-type submergible craft in 1905 and continues through the 1945 surrender of the largest submarine in the world at the time, the 5300-ton I-400 class that carried three airplanes. Submarine weapons, equipment, personnel, and shore support systems are discussed first in the context of Japanese naval preparations for war and later during the war. Both successes and missed opportunities are analyzed in operations ranging from the California coast through the Pacific and Indian Oceans to the coast of German-occupied France. Appendixes include lists of Japanese submarine losses and the biographies of key Japanese submarine officers. Rare illustrations and specifically commissioned operational maps enhance the text.

Wolf Pack

In this comprehensive book, the wartime development of the U-Boat is traced along with the experiences of typical U-Boat crewmen, from recruitment to combat.

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Author: Gordon Williamson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781780963327

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 855

Germany's World War II U-Boat fleet represented the elite of their naval personnel. In terms of technology, training, tactics and combat successes, the U-Boat Waffe was far superior to that of any other combatant nation. In this comprehensive book, the wartime development of the U-Boat is traced along with the experiences of typical U-Boat crewmen, from recruitment to combat. The author examines the operational tactics of the U-Boat fleet, as well as describing the massive bunkers that housed them. 'Wolf Pack' contains material taken from Fortress 3: 'U-Boat Bases and Bunkers 1941-45', Warrior 36: 'Grey Wolf: U-Boat Crewman of World War II' and New Vanguards 51 and 55: 'Kriegsmarine U-Boat 1939-45 (1) and (2)', with the addition of a new section on wartime tactics.

Critical German Submarine Operations Versus Allied Convoys During March 1943 An Operational Analysis

German submarine operations against allied convoys, during March 1943 is critically analyzed from an operational perspective.

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Author: LCDR Bruce E. Grooms

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 9781782898009

Category: History

Page: 39

View: 713

German submarine operations against allied convoys, during March 1943 is critically analyzed from an operational perspective. The theater commander’s operational scheme is dissected for the purpose of identifying lessons which can be applied to the planning and execution of today’s theater operations. A brief historical account of the early phases of the war and the events and decisions which preceded the critical convoy battles will be followed by an analysis of the operational scheme employed by Admiral Dönitz. German victory during the spring offensive clearly demonstrated numerous operational successes, a reasonably well conceived operational plan, and proof positive of the potential for a larger scale victory. Yet history recorded Germany’s ultimate defeat in the Battle of the Atlantic. This analysis identified three significant flaws which led to the German demise; first, strategic guidance and operational means were inadequately reconciled which prevented the proper execution of the operational plan; second, operational intelligence and reconnaissance were inadequately exploited; third, Germany failed to coordinate and execute joint operations between service arms, specifically the lack of air assets in support of vital U-boat operations. Clearly one must conclude a reasonable operational plan has marginal chance for success when strategic guidance and joint coordination are incompatible with theater objective accomplishment.

War in the Atlantic a Historical Case of Homeland Security World War II German U Boat Submarine Warfare British Shipping Losses Naval Countermeasures and the Royal Air Force Radar and Air Cover

At the outbreak of World War II, Great Britain was unprepared to counter German submarine warfare in the Atlantic.

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Author: U. S. Military

Publisher:

ISBN: 1797425781

Category:

Page: 94

View: 467

At the outbreak of World War II, Great Britain was unprepared to counter German submarine warfare in the Atlantic. In World War I, Germany had conducted a devastating U-boat campaign against merchant shipping, threatening the Atlantic supply chain that Britain depended on for goods, food, and materiel. The Royal Navy defended the commercial fleet by organizing convoy escorts. In the interwar period, the navy was burdened by a poor economy, interservice rivalry, and a treaty limiting its fleet. Historian Correlli Barnett points out that the admiralty had warned that the diminished navy was unprepared to face the rising aggression of Japan and Germany in his book Engage the Enemy More Closely, published in 1991 by Norton. When war was declared, the navy immediately resumed the convoys and escorts, but it was not sufficient to protect all routes. In the end, technological advances, above all the introduction of long-range aircraft in an antisubmarine role, helped offset British unreadiness and concomitant losses in the Atlantic, but ingenuity would not have been enough. Without strategic alliances, Britain could not have gained the upper hand.Contents: British Shipping Losses: Historical Context * Unrestricted Submarine Warfare * Economic Warfare * Desperation * Solutions * Advent Of Aircraft * Rise Of A Rival Strategy * Creation Of The Royal Air Force * Britain's Struggle To Rearm * Identifying Threats And The Enemy * Beginnings Of The Battle Of The Atlantic * Britain's Grand Strategy * Allocating Resources For Britain's War Effort * Britain's Naval Lines Of Communication * German Campaign In Scandinavia * Shifts In Britain's Grand Strategy * Battle Of Britain * British Naval Countermeasures * Britain's Concern With The Far East * War Up To December 1941 * The Development Of Radar * Leigh Light * Improved Ordnance * Britain's Relationship Between The Military And The Scientist * Winning The Battle Of The Atlantic * Making Up Losses * War For Air Cover * Mounting Losses In The Atlantic * Closing The Air Gap * The Critical Point * Success * 2019 U.S. Intelligence Community Worldwide Threat AssessmentAfter World War I, the British government struggled to achieve a collegiality and cooperation among its protective services that would allow for the development of a comprehensive strategy employing every branch (army, navy, and air force) to best advantage. But the independent services fought one another for funding and prestige. The Royal Navy's blockade had helped end the war, and yet the cost of building and maintaining a fleet of modern warships had drained the British economy, while its contribution was perceived as negligible. Military aircraft had proved that Britain was not as safe from its enemies as it once was, and Great Britain's dependency on its once supreme navy was in doubt.

The Conduct of the War Of Sea An Essay

His reaction to such interrogation and to analyses made of the essay is set forth in the Introduction.

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Author: Großadmiral Karl Dönitz

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 9781782892601

Category: History

Page: 73

View: 428

Admiral Dönitz’ essay on the Conduct of the War at Sea is published... for several reasons. It has historical significance as a review of the German Navy’s participation in World War II. Also, from the standpoint of naval science, the opinions of an enemy naval officer of Dönitz’ caliber merit study and consideration. Still more important is the forceful presentation of Hitler’s fatal error in disregarding or underestimating the necessity of sea power as a prerequisite to a major political power engaging successfully in war of any magnitude - or, by the same token, defending successfully its own political and economic boundaries and rights. In order to assist in the analysis of the essay, this publication includes a biographical sketch of the author, introductory remarks concerning the essay’s background and contents and a list of subjects in the form of a table of contents Doenitz was interrogated in order to amplify certain portions and theories of the essay, and his interrogation is also published herewith . His reaction to such interrogation and to analyses made of the essay is set forth in the Introduction.

The U boat Wars 1916 1945

Traces the development of submarine warfare from World War I to the end of World War II, placing emphasis on the Battle of the Atlantic in World War II and how it was nearly lost by the Allies

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Author: John Terraine

Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons

ISBN: STANFORD:36105041036968

Category: World War, 1914-1918

Page: 841

View: 131

Traces the development of submarine warfare from World War I to the end of World War II, placing emphasis on the Battle of the Atlantic in World War II and how it was nearly lost by the Allies