Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology

The Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology focuses on the material culture and lifeways of the peoples of prehistoric and early historic East and Southeast Asia; their origins, behavior and identities as well as their biological, ...

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Author: Junko Habu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781493965212

Category: Social Science

Page: 771

View: 719

The Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology focuses on the material culture and lifeways of the peoples of prehistoric and early historic East and Southeast Asia; their origins, behavior and identities as well as their biological, linguistic and cultural differences and commonalities. Emphasis is placed upon the interpretation of material culture to illuminate and explain social processes and relationships as well as behavior, technology, patterns and mechanisms of long-term change and chronology, in addition to the intellectual history of archaeology as a discipline in this diverse region. The Handbook augments archaeologically-focused chapters contributed by regional scholars by providing histories of research and intellectual traditions, and by maintaining a broadly comparative perspective. Archaeologically-derived data are emphasized with text-based documentary information, provided to complement interpretations of material culture. The Handbook is not restricted to art historical or purely descriptive perspectives; its geographical coverage includes the modern nation-states of China, Mongolia, Far Eastern Russia, North and South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Burma, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and East Timor.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Southeast Asia

Assembling the most current research across a variety of disciplines--from anthropology and archaeology to history, art history, and linguistics--The Oxford Handbook of Early Southeast Asia will present an invaluable resource to experienced ...

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Author: C.F.W. Higham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197564271

Category: Social Science

Page: 848

View: 195

Southeast Asia ranks among the most significant regions in the world for tracing the prehistory of human endeavor over a period in excess of two million years. It lies in the direct path of successive migrations from the African homeland that saw settlement by hominin populations such as Homo erectus and Homo floresiensis. The first Anatomically Modern Humans, following a coastal route, reached the region at least 60,000 years ago to establish a hunter gatherer tradition that survives to this day in remote forests. From about 2000 BC, human settlement of Southeast Asia was deeply affected by successive innovations that took place to the north and west, such as rice and millet farming. A millennium later, knowledge of bronze casting penetrated along the same pathways. Copper mines were identified and exploited, and metals were exchanged over hundreds of kilometers. In the Mekong Delta and elsewhere, these developments led to early states of the region, which benefitted from an agricultural revolution involving permanent ploughed rice fields. These developments illuminate how the great early kingdoms of Angkor, Champa, and Funan came to be, a vital stage in understanding the roots of the present nation states of Southeast Asia. Assembling the most current research across a variety of disciplines--from anthropology and archaeology to history, art history, and linguistics--The Oxford Handbook of Early Southeast Asia will present an invaluable resource to experienced researchers and those approaching the topic for the first time.

Subsistence Settlement Systems and Intersite Variability in the Moroiso Phase of the Early Jomon Period of Japan

This book examines the settlement patterns and intersite variability in lithic assemblages of Early Jomon (ca. 5000 BP) hunter-gatherers in Japan.

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Author: Junko Habu

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781789201703

Category: Social Science

Page: 207

View: 226

This book examines the settlement patterns and intersite variability in lithic assemblages of Early Jomon (ca. 5000 BP) hunter-gatherers in Japan. A model is proposed that links regional settlement patterns and intersite lithic assemblage variability to residential mobility. The results of this study suggest that the Early Jomon people were not sedentary, as previously assumed, but instead moved their residential basis seasonally. The implications of this result are discussed in the context of the development of hunter-gatherer cultural complexity in general and the course of Japanese prehistory in particular.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Southeast Asia

Assembling the most current research across a variety of disciplines--from anthropology and archaeology to history, art history, and linguistics--The Oxford Handbook of Early Southeast Asia will present an invaluable resource to experienced ...

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Author: C.F.W. Higham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199355365

Category: Social Science

Page: 848

View: 681

Southeast Asia ranks among the most significant regions in the world for tracing the prehistory of human endeavor over a period in excess of two million years. It lies in the direct path of successive migrations from the African homeland that saw settlement by hominin populations such as Homo erectus and Homo floresiensis. The first Anatomically Modern Humans, following a coastal route, reached the region at least 60,000 years ago to establish a hunter gatherer tradition that survives to this day in remote forests. From about 2000 BC, human settlement of Southeast Asia was deeply affected by successive innovations that took place to the north and west, such as rice and millet farming. A millennium later, knowledge of bronze casting penetrated along the same pathways. Copper mines were identified and exploited, and metals were exchanged over hundreds of kilometers. In the Mekong Delta and elsewhere, these developments led to early states of the region, which benefitted from an agricultural revolution involving permanent ploughed rice fields. These developments illuminate how the great early kingdoms of Angkor, Champa, and Funan came to be, a vital stage in understanding the roots of the present nation states of Southeast Asia. Assembling the most current research across a variety of disciplines--from anthropology and archaeology to history, art history, and linguistics--The Oxford Handbook of Early Southeast Asia will present an invaluable resource to experienced researchers and those approaching the topic for the first time.

Handbook of Gender in Archaeology

19 Gender in East and Southeast Asian Archaeology ELISABETH A. BACUS T HE ARCHAEOLOGY OF GENDER in East and Southeast Asia is a growing area of study . Although gender studies are fairly new to these regions , there already exists ...

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Author: Sarah M. Nelson

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 0759106789

Category: Social Science

Page: 913

View: 232

First reference work to explore the research on gender in archaeology.

Indigenous Peoples Heritage and Landscape in the Asia Pacific

Late Pleistocene to the Little Ice Age, edited special issue in Archaeology in Oceania 43: 11–21. ... In Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology, edited by Junko Habu, Peter V. Lape, and John W. Olsen, 97–109.

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Author: Stephen Acabado

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000408133

Category: Social Science

Page: 234

View: 568

This book demonstrates how active and meaningful collaboration between researchers and local stakeholders and indigenous communities can lead to the co-production of knowledge and the empowerment of communities. Focusing on the Asia Pacific region, this interdisciplinary volume looks at local and indigenous relations to the landscape, showing how applied scholarship and collaborative research can work to empower indigenous and descendant communities. With cases ranging across Indonesia, Thailand, Taiwan, the Philippines, Cambodia, Pohnpei, Guam, and Easter Island, this book demonstrates the many ways in which co-production of knowledge is reconnecting local and indigenous relations to the landscape, and diversifying the philosophy of human-land relations. In so doing, the book is enriching the knowledge of landscape, and changing the landscape of knowledge. This important contribution to our understanding of knowledge production will be of interest to readers across Anthropology, Archaeology, Development, Geography, Heritage Studies, Indigenous Studies, and Policy Studies.

The Routledge Handbook of Archaeology and Globalization

This unique collection applies globalization concepts to the discipline of archaeology, using a wide range of global case studies from a group of international specialists. The volume spans from as early as 10,000 cal.

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Author: Tamar Hodos

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781315448992

Category: Social Science

Page: 970

View: 704

This unique collection applies globalization concepts to the discipline of archaeology, using a wide range of global case studies from a group of international specialists. The volume spans from as early as 10,000 cal. BP to the modern era, analysing the relationship between material culture, complex connectivities between communities and groups, and cultural change. Each contributor considers globalization ideas explicitly to explore the socio-cultural connectivities of the past. In considering social practices shared between different historic groups, and also the expression of their respective identities, the papers in this volume illustrate the potential of globalization thinking to bridge the local and global in material culture analysis. The Routledge Handbook of Archaeology and Globalization is the first such volume to take a world archaeology approach, on a multi-period basis, in order to bring together the scope of evidence for the significance of material culture in the processes of globalization. This work thus also provides a means to understand how material culture can be used to assess the impact of global engagement in our contemporary world. As such, it will appeal to archaeologists and historians as well as social science researchers interested in the origins of globalization.

Collision or Collaboration

Rainforest foraging and farming in Island Southeast Asia: The archaeology of the Niah Caves, Sarawak (McDonald Institute Monograph Series, ... In J. Habu, J. Olsen, & P. Lape (Eds.), Handbook of East and Southeast Asian archaeology.

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Author: Peter G. Gould

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319445151

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 706

Archaeology has an often contentious relationship with the consequences of economic development. Tourism, urban development and natural resource exploitation have generated adverse impact on the archaeological record, indigenous cultures and local communities worldwide. Over the decades, international conventions, national laws and corporate ventures have sought to address the problems, but too often they have fallen short and immense challenges remain. Looking ahead, the contributions to this volume constitute a global conversation on the most salient issue facing archaeology as it interacts with economic development: Is collision with development still the best course? Or, is a more effective strategy to pursue collaborative relationships with the forces of economic and social change?

The Routledge Handbook of Bioarchaeology in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands

Journal of Southeast Asian Archaeology 17(6): 72–82. Carbonnel, J. P. (1979). “Recent Data on the Cambodian Neolithic: The Problem of Cultural Continuity in Southern Indochina.” In Early South East Asia: Essays in Archaeology, ...

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Author: Marc Oxenham

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317534006

Category: Social Science

Page: 684

View: 884

In recent years the bioarchaeology of Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands has seen enormous progress. This new and exciting research is synthesised, contextualised and expanded upon in The Routledge Handbook of Bioarchaeology in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. The volume is divided into two broad sections, one dealing with mainland and island Southeast Asia, and a second section dealing with the Pacific islands. A multi-scalar approach is employed to the bio-social dimensions of Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands with contributions alternating between region and/or site specific scales of operation to the individual or personal scale. The more personal level of osteobiographies enriches the understanding of the lived experience in past communities. Including a number of contributions from sub-disciplinary approaches tangential to bioarchaeology the book provides a broad theoretical and methodological approach. Providing new information on the globally relevant topics of farming, population mobility, subsistence and health, no other volume provides such a range of coverage on these important themes.

Forts and Fortification in Wallacea

Archaeological and Ethnohistoric Investigations Sue O'Connor, Andrew McWilliam, Sally Brockwell ... Southeast Asian ceramics, ninth through seventeenth centuries. ... The handbook of East and South East Asian archaeology.

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Author: Sue O'Connor

Publisher: ANU Press

ISBN: 9781760463892

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 281

‘This volume presents ground-breaking research on fortified sites in three parts of Wallacea by a highly regarded group of scholars from Australia, Europe, Southeast Asia and the United States. In addition to surveying and dating defensive sites in often remote and difficult terrain, the chapters provide an important and scholarly set of archaeological and ethnohistoric studies that investigate the origin of forts in Wallacea. Socio-political instability from climate events, the materialisation of indigenous belief systems, and the substantial impact of imperial expansion and European colonialism are examined and comprise a significant addition to our knowledge of conflict and warfare in an under-studied part of the Indo-Pacific. The archaeological record for past conflict is frequently ambiguous and the contribution of warfare to social development is mired in debate and paradox. Authors demonstrate that forts and other defensive constructions are costly and complicated structures that, while designed and built to protect a community from a threat of imminent violence, had (and have) complicated life histories as a result of their architectural permanence, strategic locations and traditional cultural and political significance. Understanding why conflict outbreaks – like human colonisation – often appear in the past as a punctuated event can best be approached through long-term records of conflict and violence involving archaeology and allied historical disciplines, as has been successfully done here. The volume is essential reading for archaeologists, cultural heritage managers and those with an interest in conflict studies.’ — Professor Geoffrey Clark, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University, Canberra.