Hopi Basket Weaving

Almarie Masayestewa starts the yayni ( beginning ) of a wicker plaque . A Hopi wicker basket weaver starts her plaque or basket by laying a certain amount of warp sticks parallel to each other . For convenience , the warp sticks ...

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Author: Helga Teiwes

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816516154

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 252

View: 707

"With the inborn wisdom that has guided them for so long through so many obstacles, Hopi men and women perpetuate their proven rituals, strongly encouraging those who attempt to neglect or disrespect their obligations to uphold them. One of these obligations is to respect the flora and fauna of our planet. The Hopi closeness to the Earth is represented in all the arts of all three mesas, whether in clay or natural fibers. What clay is to a potter's hands, natural fibers are to a basket weaver."--from the Introduction Rising dramatically from the desert floor, Arizona's windswept mesas have been home to the Hopis for hundreds of years. A people known for protecting their privacy, these Native Americans also have a long and less known tradition of weaving baskets and plaques. Generations of Hopi weavers have passed down knowledge of techniques and materials from the plant world around them, from mother to daughter, granddaughter, or niece. This book is filled with photographs and detailed descriptions of their beautiful baskets--the one art, above all others, that creates the strongest social bonds in Hopi life. In these pages, weavers open their lives to the outside world as a means of sharing an art form especially demanding of time and talent. The reader learns how plant materials are gathered in canyons and creek bottoms, close to home and far away. The long, painstaking process of preparation and dying is followed step by step. Then, using techniques of coiled, plaited, or wicker basketry, the weaving begins. Underlying the stories of baskets and their weavers is a rare glimpse of what is called "the Hopi Way," a life philosophy that has strengthened and sustained the Hopi people through centuries of change. Many other glimpses of the Hopi world are also shared by author and photographer Helga Teiwes, who was warmly invited into the homes of her collaborators. Their permission and the permission of the Cultural Preservation Office of the Hopi Tribe gave her access to people and information seldom available to outsiders. Teiwes was also granted access to some of the ceremonial observances where baskets are preeminent. Woven in brilliant reds, greens, and yellows as well as black and white, Hopi weavings, then, not only are an arresting art form but also are highly symbolic of what is most important in Hopi life. In the women's basket dance, for example, woven plaques commemorate and honor the Earth and the perpetuation of life. Other plaques play a role in the complicated web of Hopi social obligation and reciprocity. Living in a landscape of almost surreal form and color, Hopi weavers are carrying on one of the oldest arts traditions in the world. Their stories in Hopi Basket Weaving will appeal to collectors, artists and craftspeople, and anyone with an interest in Native American studies, especially Native American arts. For the traveler or general reader, the book is an invitation to enter a little-known world and to learn more about an art form steeped in meaning and stunning in its beauty.

Hopi Basket Weaving

This book is filled with photographs and detailed descriptions of their beautiful baskets--the one art, above all others, that creates the strongest social bonds in Hopi life.

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Author: Helga Teiwes

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816516155

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 200

View: 318

"With the inborn wisdom that has guided them for so long through so many obstacles, Hopi men and women perpetuate their proven rituals, strongly encouraging those who attempt to neglect or disrespect their obligations to uphold them. One of these obligations is to respect the flora and fauna of our planet. The Hopi closeness to the Earth is represented in all the arts of all three mesas, whether in clay or natural fibers. What clay is to a potter's hands, natural fibers are to a basket weaver."--from the Introduction Rising dramatically from the desert floor, Arizona's windswept mesas have been home to the Hopis for hundreds of years. A people known for protecting their privacy, these Native Americans also have a long and less known tradition of weaving baskets and plaques. Generations of Hopi weavers have passed down knowledge of techniques and materials from the plant world around them, from mother to daughter, granddaughter, or niece. This book is filled with photographs and detailed descriptions of their beautiful baskets--the one art, above all others, that creates the strongest social bonds in Hopi life. In these pages, weavers open their lives to the outside world as a means of sharing an art form especially demanding of time and talent. The reader learns how plant materials are gathered in canyons and creek bottoms, close to home and far away. The long, painstaking process of preparation and dying is followed step by step. Then, using techniques of coiled, plaited, or wicker basketry, the weaving begins. Underlying the stories of baskets and their weavers is a rare glimpse of what is called "the Hopi Way," a life philosophy that has strengthened and sustained the Hopi people through centuries of change. Many other glimpses of the Hopi world are also shared by author and photographer Helga Teiwes, who was warmly invited into the homes of her collaborators. Their permission and the permission of the Cultural Preservation Office of the Hopi Tribe gave her access to people and information seldom available to outsiders. Teiwes was also granted access to some of the ceremonial observances where baskets are preeminent. Woven in brilliant reds, greens, and yellows as well as black and white, Hopi weavings, then, not only are an arresting art form but also are highly symbolic of what is most important in Hopi life. In the women's basket dance, for example, woven plaques commemorate and honor the Earth and the perpetuation of life. Other plaques play a role in the complicated web of Hopi social obligation and reciprocity. Living in a landscape of almost surreal form and color, Hopi weavers are carrying on one of the oldest arts traditions in the world. Their stories in Hopi Basket Weaving will appeal to collectors, artists and craftspeople, and anyone with an interest in Native American studies, especially Native American arts. For the traveler or general reader, the book is an invitation to enter a little-known world and to learn more about an art form steeped in meaning and stunning in its beauty.

Hopi Wicker Plaques Baskets

This new and original survey details the beautiful styles and designs of woven plaques and baskets made by Hopi women artists of Third Mesa in Arizona.

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Author: Robert W. Rhodes

Publisher: Schiffer Pub Limited

ISBN: 0764326856

Category: Art

Page: 159

View: 250

This new and original survey details the beautiful styles and designs of woven plaques and baskets made by Hopi women artists of Third Mesa in Arizona. It presents 67 different design categories through over 475 color photographs. The history of the Hopi people, weaving materials and techniques, different uses of the baskets and plaques, and their values today all are dicussed. Explanations of the named pattern designs, including Sunflower, Wedding Basket, and Dragonfly, as well as unnamed and the coveted Katsina plaques are given. This valuable refereance enables readers to more easily identify old and contemporary examples in private collections, museums, and art galleries.

The Art of Native American Basketry

If necessary , other warps are added , as in the diameter growth of a plaque . Hopi wicker baskets ( Plate 33 ) have employed more color than any other Southwest type — yellow , green , blue , black , red , orange , and even pale shades ...

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Author: Frank W. Porter

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313267162

Category: Social Science

Page: 426

View: 484

George Wharton James once commented that the basket to the Indian "meant a work of art, in which hope, aspiration, desire, love, religion, poetry, national pride, mythology, were all more or less interwoven." The first major study of the subject since 1904, this book presents essays written by those intimately familiar with the basket makers and basketry of North America. Illustrated with approximately 80 black-and-white photographs--many of which are historical records of basketry--Native American Basketry uses archaeological, ethnographic, historical and contemporary information in discussing the changes in native basketry from prehistoric times to the present.

The Hopi People

Rhodes , Robert W. Hopi Wicker Plaques and Baskets . Atglen , PA : Schiffer Publishing , 2007 . Schaaf , Gregory . Hopi - Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies . Santa Fe , NM : CIAC Press , 1998 . Silas , Anna . Journey to Hopi Land .

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Author: Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738556483

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 604

The diverse people of the Hopi, whose name means "the peaceful ones," are today united on the Hopi Reservation, which is composed of 12 villages on more than 2,500 square miles in northeastern Arizona. In fact, the village of Orayvi is considered the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in the United States, dating back more than a millennium. Often referred to as a "corn culture," the Hopis have developed dry-farming techniques that have sustained them in the harsh, arid landscape, where annual precipitation is often only 12 inches or less. The Hopi people are hardworking and spiritual, and their lifestyle has survived for centuries, only minimally changed by influences from the outside world.

Education Beyond the Mesas

Usingher ability to weave baskets and Hopi coil and wicker plaques, Susie became known throughout the school for hertalentin basketry. Susie's abilities stood asan example for theHopi and nonHopigirlsinthe Needle Art Department whose ...

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Author: Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803268319

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 404

Education beyond the Mesas is the fascinating story of how generations of Hopi schoolchildren from northeastern Arizona “turned the power” by using compulsory federal education to affirm their way of life and better their community. Sherman Institute in Riverside, California, one of the largest off-reservation boarding schools in the United States, followed other federally funded boarding schools of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in promoting the assimilation of indigenous people into mainstream America. Many Hopi schoolchildren, deeply conversant in Hopi values and traditional education before being sent to Sherman Institute, resisted this program of acculturation. Immersed in learning about another world, generations of Hopi children drew on their culture to skillfully navigate a system designed to change them irrevocably. In fact, not only did the Hopi children strengthen their commitment to their families and communities while away in the “land of oranges,” they used their new skills, fluency in English, and knowledge of politics and economics to help their people when they eventually returned home. Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert draws on interviews, archival records, and his own experiences growing up in the Hopi community to offer a powerful account of a quiet, enduring triumph.

Indians at Work

Hopi plaques are considered the finest wicker basketry in the world . They are bought by white man and Indian alike , to be used as souvenirs by the former and to hold the sacred meal of the latter . One of the contributing factors to ...

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Author: United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105120208546

Category: Indians of North America

Page:

View: 934

Indians at Work

Hopi plaques are considered the finest wicker basketry in the world . They are bought by white man and Indian alike , to be used as souvenirs by the former and to hold the sacred meal of the latter . One of the contributing factors to ...

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Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: OSU:32435029806924

Category: Indians of North America

Page:

View: 118

A Study of the Changes in Ojibwa Tlinget and Hopi Basketry as Relating to Economic Political Societal and Historical Changes in the Respective Societies

Table 24 : Number of baskets using a specific color in the decorative designs ( Hopi wicker plaques , Arizona State Museum ) . Collection Year and Number of Baskets Color 1800-1890s 19000-1910s 1920s 1930-1940s 1950-1970s Red 1 3 3 0 0 ...

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Author: Nancy Elizabeth McDonald

Publisher:

ISBN: MSU:31293013890219

Category: Electronic dissertations

Page: 508

View: 670

Indian Basketry

337 are various baskets in the Benham collection . No. 5 is a well made and colored Oraibi ( Hopi ) sacred meal tray , while No. 6 is a Mashonganavi ( Hopi ) yucca plaque of star design , most accurately and beautifully worked out .

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Author: George Wharton James

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3599575

Category: Basket making

Page: 407

View: 563