Living for the Revolution

The organizations that Springer examines were the first to explicitly use feminist theory to further the work of previous black women’s organizations.

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Author: Kimberly Springer

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822386858

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 557

The first in-depth analysis of the black feminist movement, Living for the Revolution fills in a crucial but overlooked chapter in African American, women’s, and social movement history. Through original oral history interviews with key activists and analysis of previously unexamined organizational records, Kimberly Springer traces the emergence, life, and decline of several black feminist organizations: the Third World Women’s Alliance, Black Women Organized for Action, the National Black Feminist Organization, the National Alliance of Black Feminists, and the Combahee River Collective. The first of these to form was founded in 1968; all five were defunct by 1980. Springer demonstrates that these organizations led the way in articulating an activist vision formed by the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality. The organizations that Springer examines were the first to explicitly use feminist theory to further the work of previous black women’s organizations. As she describes, they emerged in response to marginalization in the civil rights and women’s movements, stereotyping in popular culture, and misrepresentation in public policy. Springer compares the organizations’ ideologies, goals, activities, memberships, leadership styles, finances, and communication strategies. Reflecting on the conflicts, lack of resources, and burnout that led to the demise of these groups, she considers the future of black feminist organizing, particularly at the national level. Living for the Revolution is an essential reference: it provides the history of a movement that influenced black feminist theory and civil rights activism for decades to come.

The Crisis

Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 1968-1980 By Kimberly Springer (Duke University Press, $21.95) ot every dissertation turns into a remarkable book. But thank goodness Kimberly Springer chose to research and ...

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Page: 60

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The Crisis, founded by W.E.B. Du Bois as the official publication of the NAACP, is a journal of civil rights, history, politics, and culture and seeks to educate and challenge its readers about issues that continue to plague African Americans and other communities of color. For nearly 100 years, The Crisis has been the magazine of opinion and thought leaders, decision makers, peacemakers and justice seekers. It has chronicled, informed, educated, entertained and, in many instances, set the economic, political and social agenda for our nation and its multi-ethnic citizens.

The Trouble Between Us

An Uneasy History of White and Black Women in the Feminist Movement Winifred Breines ... Kimberly Springer, Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 1968-1980 (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2005), indicated the ...

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Author: Winifred Breines

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190292492

Category: History

Page: 280

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Inspired by the idealism of the civil rights movement, the women who launched the radical second wave of the feminist movement believed, as a bedrock principle, in universal sisterhood and color-blind democracy. Their hopes, however, were soon dashed. To this day, the failure to create an integrated movement remains a sensitive and contested issue. In The Trouble Between Us, Winifred Breines explores why a racially integrated women's liberation movement did not develop in the United States. Drawing on flyers, letters, newspapers, journals, institutional records, and oral histories, Breines dissects how white and black women's participation in the movements of the 1960s led to the development of separate feminisms. Herself a participant in these events, Breines attempts to reconcile the explicit professions of anti-racism by white feminists with the accusations of mistreatment, ignorance, and neglect by African American feminists. Many radical white women, unable to see beyond their own experiences and idealism, often behaved in unconsciously or abstractly racist ways, despite their passionately anti-racist stance and hard work to develop an interracial movement. As Breines argues, however, white feminists' racism is not the only reason for the absence of an interracial feminist movement. Segregation, black women's interest in the Black Power movement, class differences, and the development of identity politics with an emphasis on "difference" were all powerful factors that divided white and black women. By the late 1970s and early 1980s white feminists began to understand black feminism's call to include race and class in gender analyses, and black feminists began to give white feminists some credit for their political work. Despite early setbacks, white and black radical feminists eventually developed cross-racial feminist political projects. Their struggle to bridge the racial divide provides a model for all Americans in a multiracial society.

Intents and Purposes

Let us first consider some important dates in the history of African American feminism. ... Indeed, the title of Kimberly Springer's 2005 book, Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 19681980, is indicative ...

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Author: Eric Lewis

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472131303

Category: Music

Page: 280

View: 916

How do we define improvised music? What is the relationship of highly improvised performances to the work they are performances of? How do we decide what are the important parts of an improvised musical work? In Intents and Purposes, Eric Lewis uses a series of case studies to challenge assumptions about what defines a musical work and musical performance, seeking to go beyond philosophical and aesthetic templates from Western classical music to foreground the distinctive practices and aesthetics of jazz. Pushing aside the assumption that composition and improvisation are different (or even opposed) musical practices, Lewis’s philosophically informed approach revisits key topics in musical ontology, such as how to define the triangle of composer-performer-listener, and the status of live performances in relation to scores and recordings. Drawing on critical race theory, feminist theory, new musicology, sociology, cognitive science, and genre theory, Lewis opens up new questions about agency in performance, as well as new ways of considering the historical relationships between improvisational practices with roots in different cultural frameworks. By showing how jazz can be both art, idea, and action all at the same time, Lewis offers a new way of seeing any improvised musical performance in a new culturally and aesthetically rich context.

Exchanges and Correspondence

The Black Panther, 28 September 1968, 11. ... In Sisterhood is Powerful: An Anthology of Writings from the Women's Liberation Movement, edited by Robin Morgan, ... Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations 1968-1980.

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Author: Claudette Fillard

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443824422

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 397

Through the eighteen essays of this book, the reader becomes the beholder of a challenging survey of “feminism-in-the-making,” from its early stages in the 18th century to the present, in Anglo-Saxon countries and elsewhere, including Eastern Europe and some places under the influence of communism or Islam. The development of exchanges and correspondence enabled feminism to pre-exist the word itself, which leads several contributors to ponder over its meaning as well as over the notion of influence, a pivotal component of their reflection. Through the complex interplay of harmony and disharmony, openly acknowledged or carefully hidden similarities or differences, and the delineation of the converging or conflicting forces which the authors of this volume attempt to disentangle, a fascinating chorus of voices eventually emerges from this volume, a preview of the budding “sisterhood.” It throws light on the major factors in women’s growing consciousness of their plight and of the main stakes in the struggle for the defense of their rights. Scholars of different national origins and methodological approaches here join forces until the book itself amounts to an innovative web of exchanges and correspondences, its medium as well as its avowed message.

The Weatherwomen

2 (Summer 2002), 336–360; Kimberly Springer, Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 19681980 (Durham: Duke University Press, 2005); Wini Breines, “What's Love Got to Do with It? White Women, Black Women, and Feminism ...

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Author: Mona Rocha

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476638805

Category: Social Science

Page: 235

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Assertive, tough, and idealistic, the Weatherwomen--members of the Weather Underground Organization (WUO) from the late 1960s--were determined to stamp out sexism and social injustice. They asserted that militancy was necessary in the pursuit of a socialist revolution that would produce gender, racial, and class equality. This book excavates their long buried history and reclaims the voices of the Weatherwomen. The Weatherwomen's militant feminism had many facets. It criticized the role of women in the home, was concerned with the subordination of women to men, attacked the gender pay gap, and supported female bodily integrity. The Weatherwomen also refined their own feminist ideology into an intersectional one that would incorporate multiple identity perspectives beyond the white, American, middle-class perspective. In shaping a feminist vision for the WUO, the Weatherwomen dealt with sexism within their own organization and were dismissed by some feminist groups of the time as inauthentic. This work strives to recognize the WUO's militant feminist efforts, and the agency, autonomy, and empowerment of its female members, by concentrating on their actions and writings.

Black Power Encyclopedia From Black is Beautiful to Urban Uprisings 2 volumes

Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 19681980. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Taylor, Ula Y. 1998. “Making Waves: The Theory and Practice of Black Feminism.” Black Social Issues, special issue of Black Scholar ...

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Author: Akinyele Umoja

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440840074

Category: Social Science

Page: 904

View: 803

An invaluable resource that documents the Black Power Movement by its cultural representation and promotion of self-determination and self-defense, and showcases the movement's influence on Black communities in America from 1965 to the mid-1970s. • Gives students and general readers a comprehensive overview of the Black Power Movement and an understanding of its importance within the turbulence and politics of the 1960s and 1970s in the United States as well as in the context of modern-day civil rights • Provides insight into important concepts such as Black self-determination, Black consciousness, independent Black politics, and independent institutions • Features contributions from premier Black Power scholars as well as Black Power activists • Offers topical and biographical entries, a timeline of events, and a bibliography of key print and nonprint sources of additional information

Intersectionality

In Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 19681980, Springer characterizes Black feminist politics in autonomous organizations—such as the Third World Women's Alliance, the National Black Feminist Organization, ...

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Author: Anna Carastathis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803296640

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

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A 2017 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Intersectionality intervenes in the field of intersectionality studies: the integrative examination of the effects of racial, gendered, and class power on people’s lives. While “intersectionality” circulates as a buzzword, Anna Carastathis joins other critical voices to urge a more careful reading. Challenging the narratives of arrival that surround it, Carastathis argues that intersectionality is a horizon, illuminating ways of thinking that have yet to be realized; consequently, calls to “go beyond” intersectionality are premature. A provisional interpretation of intersectionality can disorient habits of essentialism, categorial purity, and prototypicality and overcome dynamics of segregation and subordination in political movements. Through a close reading of critical race theorist Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw’s germinal texts, published more than twenty-five years ago, Carastathis urges analytic clarity, contextual rigor, and a politicized, historicized understanding of this widely traveling concept. Intersectionality’s roots in social justice movements and critical intellectual projects—specifically Black feminism—must be retraced and synthesized with a decolonial analysis so its radical potential to actualize coalitions can be enacted.

Intersectionality and Criminology

5 See Kimberly Springer's (2005) Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 19681980 for an in-depth examination of the Third World Women's Alliance (1968–1979), the National Black Feminist Organization (1973–1975), ...

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Author: Hillary Potter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136207471

Category: Social Science

Page: 194

View: 607

The use of intersectionality theory in the social sciences has proliferated in the past several years, putting forward the argument that the interconnected identities of individuals, and the way these identities are perceived and responded to by others, must be a necessary part of any analysis. Fundamentally, intersectionality claims that not only are people’s lived experiences affected by their racial identity and by their gender identity, but that these identities, and others, continually operate together and affect each other. With "official" statistical data that indicate people of Color have higher offending and victimization rates than White people, and with the overrepresentation of men and people of Color in the criminal legal system, new theories are required that address these phenomena and that are devoid of stereotypical or debasing underpinnings. Intersectionality and Criminology provides a comprehensive review of the need for, and use of, intersectionality in the study of crime, criminality, and the criminal legal system. This is essential reading for academics and students researching and studying in the fields of crime, criminal justice, theoretical criminology, and gender, race, and socioeconomic class.

Junctures in Women s Leadership Social Movements

Beverly Davis, “To Seize the Moment: A Retrospective on the National Black Feminist Organization,” SAGE 5 (1988): 46–49. 59. Kimberly Springer, Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 19681980, Kindle Edition (Durham, ...

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Author: Mary K. Trigg

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813575438

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 282

View: 932

2016 Choice Outstanding Academic Title From Eleanor Roosevelt to feminist icon Gloria Steinem to HIV/AIDS activist Dazon Dixon Diallo, women have assumed leadership roles in struggles for social justice. How did these remarkable women ascend to positions of influence? And once in power, what leadership strategies did they use to deal with various challenges? Junctures in Women’s Leadership: Social Movements explores these questions by introducing twelve women who have spearheaded a wide array of social movements that span the 1940s to the present, working for indigenous peoples’ rights, gender equality, reproductive rights, labor advocacy, environmental justice, and other causes. The women profiled here work in a variety of arenas across the globe: Planned Parenthood CEO Cecile Richards, New York City labor organizer Bhairavi Desai, women’s rights leader Charlotte Bunch, feminist poet Audre Lorde, civil rights activists Daisy Bates and Aileen Clarke Hernandez, Kenyan environmental activist Wangari Maathai, Nicaraguan revolutionary Mirna Cunningham, and South African public prosecutor Thuli Madonsela. What unites them all is the way these women made sacrifices, asked critical questions, challenged injustice, and exhibited the will to act in the face of often-harsh criticism and violence. The case studies in Junctures in Women’s Leadership: Social Movements demonstrate the diversity of ways that women around the world have practiced leadership, in many instances overcoming rigid cultural expectations about gender. Moreover, the cases provide a unique window into the ways that women leaders make decisions at moments of struggle and historical change.