The Complete Concordance to Shakespeare

Cæsar , iv . 2 ENEMY - he was your enemy ...... Coriolanus , ii . 3 I'll not endure
him . He shall .... Romeo & Juliet , i . ... not endure it iii . 3 brought to yoke , the
enemies of Rome i . 2 say , their great enemy is gone iv . 2 I will indeed , no
longer ...

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Mary Cowden Clarke

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X000737411

Category: English language

Page: 860

View: 954

The Complete Concordance to Shakspere

5 such men my friends than eremies V. 4 that he's your fixed enemy , and revoke
ii . 3 you'll not ... not endure it iii . 3 brought to yoke , the enemies of Rome i . 2
way , their great enemy is gone iv . 2 I will indeed , no longer endure it ........ iv .

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Mary Cowden Clarke

Publisher:

ISBN: UIUC:30112057490002

Category:

Page: 860

View: 564

The Complete Concordance to Shakespere Being a Verbal Index to All the Passages in the Dramatic Works of the Poet

3 brought to yoke , the enemies of Rome i . 2 say , their great enemy is gone iv . 2
I will indeed , no longer endure it ........ iv . 2 thrown down so many enemies .... iii .
1 my love's upon this enemy town iv . 4 ENDURED - and not to be endured .

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Mary Victoria Cowden CLARKE

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0019366175

Category:

Page: 860

View: 396

The complete concordance to Shakspere

Henry . ii . 1 Rome could afford no tribune like .. God joined my heart and
Romeo's . iv . ) and rank fumitory , doth root upon v . 2 Rome is but a ... helle , ii . 3
to beg relief anong Rome's enemies till my very roof was dry .. Merchant of lenice
, iii .

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Mary Victoria Cowden Clarke

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:590237888

Category:

Page:

View: 283

War and Imperialism in Republican Rome 327 70 B C

Since Rome's enemies were generally familiar neighbours whose gods either
were identical with Rome's or were at least felt to be powerful , elaborate ... 2 ,
Ogilvie , Commentary , 127 ; further bibliography in Hausmaninger , O.C. 340 n .
27 .

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: William Vernon Harris

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198148666

Category: Fiction

Page: 293

View: 970

Between 327 and 70 B.C. the Romans expanded their empire throughout the Mediterranean world. This highly original study looks at Roman attitudes and behavior that lay behind their quest for power. How did Romans respond to warfare, year after year? How important were the material gains of military success--land, slaves, and other riches--commonly supposed to have been merely an incidental result? What value is there in the claim of the contemporary historian Polybius that the Romans were driven by a greater and greater ambition to expand their empire? The author answers these questions within an analytic framework, and comes to an interpretation of Roman imperialism that differs sharply from the conventional ones.

A History of Rome Third edition

The Scipios arrived in Asia with an army of about 20,000 men , while that of
Antiochus consisted of 70,000 : no sooner ... and other enemies of Rome who
had taken refuge in his dominions : and , lastly , to give his younger son
Antiochus as a hostage to the Romans . ... Eumenes was rewarded , for the N 2
B.C. 191-190 .

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Leonhard SCHMITZ

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0019254502

Category:

Page:

View: 645

The Library Philip II Alexander the Great and the Successors

Rome achieves no prominence in his account until well into the third century. ...
his time as deca- dent, corrupted by imperial wealth,11 and at 32.4–5 and 32.26.
2 he contrasts the decency of earlier Romans, ... There is a similar ambivalence
as regards Rome's enemies, who are often portrayed as moral villains, as though
it ...

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Diodorus Siculus

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198759881

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 374

Starting with the most meagre resources, Philip made his kingdom the greatest power in Europe The Greek historian Diodorus of Sicily is one of our most valuable sources from ancient times. His history, in forty volumes, was intended to range from mythological times to 60 BCE, and fifteen of The Library's forty books survive. This new translation by Robin Waterfield of books 16-20 covers a vital period in European history. Book 16 is devoted to Philip, and without it the career of this great king would be far more obscure to us. Book 17 is the earliest surviving account by over a hundred years of the world-changing eastern conquests of Alexander the Great, Philip's son. Books 18-20 constitute virtually our sole source of information on the twenty turbulent years following Alexander's death and on the violent path followed by Agathocles of Syracuse. There are fascinating snippets of history from elsewhere too - from Republican Rome, the Cimmerian Bosporus, and elsewhere. Despite his obvious importance, Diodorus is a neglected historian. This is the first English translation of any of these books in over fifty years. The introduction places Diodorus in his context in first-century-BCE Rome, describes and discusses the kind of history he was intending to write, and assesses his strengths and weaknesses as a historian. With extensive explanatory notes on this gripping and sensational period of history, the book serves as a unique resource for historians and students.

Select Plays Coriolanus

2. 71 . 99. do . The first folio has • doth , ' a blunder which no ingenuity can defend
. It is corrected in the later folios . ... 2. 19 , 28. The folios have ' from Rome . ' Dr.
Schmidt takes from Rome her enemies ' as equivalent to from Rome's enemies ...

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105048025287

Category:

Page: 43

View: 360

Ancient Society

It is not surprising that many of Rome's enemies would have a Juno or similar
female deity that the Romans would ... 496 ( Livy II 20.12-13 ) brought these Latin
gods to Rome , but there is no evidence that they were evoked from a specific city
 ...

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105005540914

Category: History, Ancient

Page:

View: 238

The Durham University Journal

14 ) ; this does not suggest a permanent garrison of 2 legions in each Spanish
province . The Governor of Asia had proconsular ... Mithridatic Wars ; there was
none ; n . 2 , ib . , Servilius Vatia is lumped incongruously among Rome's
enemies .

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: University of Durham

Publisher:

ISBN: UCLA:31158003139408

Category: Books

Page:

View: 534

Horace s Iambic Criticism

The Gallic tribe, the Allobroges, took every opportunity to revolt against Rome,
but Catiline could not trust them to keep his own ... history excuses Rome's
enemies (quam [Romam] neque . .. valuerunt perdere; nec . .. domuit, “they did
not destroy nor ... “Rome,” “strength” (00')1ur|), is being destroyed by her own
strength (suis et ipsa Roma viribus ruit, 2).7 Rome is being true to herself, acting
out her name.

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Timothy S. Johnson

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004215238

Category: Poetry

Page: 314

View: 883

By examining the relationship of the iambic tradition with ritual, this book studies how Horace’s Epodes are more than partisan (consolidating Octavian’s victory by projecting hostilities onto powerless others) but a meta-partisan project (forming fractured entities into a diversified unity).

The Complete Concordance to Shakespeare

Henry V. ii . 4 Rome could afford no tribune like God joined my heart and
Romeo's .. iv . 1 and rank fumitory , doth root upon v . 2 Rome is but a ... Othello ,
li . to beg relief among Rome's enemies V. 3 till my very roof was dry .. Merchant
of ...

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X002314989

Category:

Page: 860

View: 198

Werke

Marcus , Lucils , and their And sent her enemies unto the grave : partisans , go up
into the balcony . ... Speak , Rome's dear friend , as erst our an- For , when no
friends are by , inen praise themselves . ... Sc . 2 ) Æneas our great ancestor .

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher:

ISBN: BSB:BSB11342576

Category:

Page: 858

View: 842

Journal of Roman Archaeology

1 and the cornerstone upon which G . ' s larger case rests — tactically
independent cohorts — has not been proved and is already refuted ( supra n . 4 )
. Chapts . 2 - 3 address Rome ' s enemies ( limited to Gauls , Germans , and
Parthians ) ...

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015052817924

Category: Africa, North

Page:

View: 513

Origines Celticae a Fragment and Other Contributions to the History of Britain

58 and no Fretherne ( Gloucestershire ) , why not Fethanleag , ii . 286 and n . ,
287 . Freur , ii . 301 , 323 ; Kyndylan's ... among the fiercest of Rome's enemies ,
ib .; historical notices , ib . , 39 ; from which the author concludes that G. = men of
 ...

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Edwin Guest

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105015803542

Category: Ethnology

Page:

View: 288

Hannibal

If it had, the history of the West would have been changed in ways that can only be imagined. Richard A. Gabriel's brilliant new biography shows how Hannibal's genius nearly unseated the Roman Empire.

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Richard A. Gabriel

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 9781597976862

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 474

The Romans' destruction of Carthage after the Third Punic War erased any Carthaginian historical record of Hannibal's life. What we know of him comes exclusively from Roman historians who had every interest in minimizing his success, exaggerating his failures, and disparaging his character. The charges leveled against Hannibal include greed, cruelty and atrocity, sexual indulgence, and even cannibalism. But even these sources were forced to grudgingly admit to Hannibal's military genius, if only to make their eventual victory over him appear greater. Yet there is no doubt that Hannibal was the greatest Carthaginian general of the Second Punic War. When he did not defeat them outright, he fought to a standstill the best generals Rome produced, and he sustained his army in the field for sixteen long years without mutiny or desertion. Hannibal was a first-rate tactician, only a somewhat lesser strategist, and the greatest enemy Rome ever faced. When he at last met defeat at the hands of the Roman general Scipio, it was against an experienced officer who had to strengthen and reconfigure the Roman legion and invent mobile tactics in order to succeed. Even so, Scipio's victory at Zama was against an army that was a shadow of its former self. The battle could easily have gone the other way. If it had, the history of the West would have been changed in ways that can only be imagined. Richard A. Gabriel's brilliant new biography shows how Hannibal's genius nearly unseated the Roman Empire.