The Convent of Pleasure A Comedy

MAdam, you being young, handsome, rich, and virtuous, I hope you will not cast away those gifts of Nature, Fortune, and Heaven, upon a Person which cannot merit you?

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Author: Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 9781465603227

Category:

Page:

View: 147

MAdam, you being young, handsome, rich, and virtuous, I hope you will not cast away those gifts of Nature, Fortune, and Heaven, upon a Person which cannot merit you? L. Happy. Let me tell you, that Riches ought to be bestowed on such as are poor, and want means to maintain themselves; and Youth, on those that are old; Beauty, on those that are ill-favoured; and Virtue, on those that are vicious: So that if I should place my gifts rightly, I must Marry one that's poor, old, ill-favoured, and debauch'd.

The Convent of Pleasure and Other Plays

A valuable collection from an extraordinary writer, "The Convent of Pleasureand Other Plays raises important issues about women and gender.

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Author: Margaret Cavendish

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press

ISBN: 0801861004

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 374

A valuable collection from an extraordinary writer, "The Convent of Pleasureand Other Plays raises important issues about women and gender.

The Convent of Pleasure

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Author: Margaret Cavendish Duchess of Newcastle

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1122602810

Category: Women

Page:

View: 176

The Convent of Pleasure

She did not limit herself to the genres considered "acceptable" for those few women who dared to publish in the late seventeenth century; instead, she wrote philosophical and scientific works, a utopian romance that has often been called ...

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Author: Margaret Cavendish

Publisher:

ISBN: 0692654623

Category:

Page: 204

View: 470

Margaret Lucas Cavendish, duchess of Newcastle (1623-1673), began her literary career in 1653, with the publication of a volume of her poems and another of her "philosophical fancies." Her writing continued at a hectic pace for nearly two decades. She did not limit herself to the genres considered "acceptable" for those few women who dared to publish in the late seventeenth century; instead, she wrote philosophical and scientific works, a utopian romance that has often been called the first work of science fiction in English, a biography of her husband, and her own autobiography. She also published two collections of dramatic works: the first of these, Plays, appeared in 1662, the second, Plays, Never before Printed, in 1668. Cavendish was keenly aware that her comedies and tragedies were unlikely to be acted, at least in her lifetime, but that did not deter her. "To those that do delight in scenes and wit / I dedicate my book," she writes in a brief poem at the beginning of Plays. She continues, "For all the time my plays a-making were, / My brain the stage, my thoughts were acting there." Today the most widely read of Cavendish's plays is The Convent of Pleasure, from Plays, Never before Printed. In this provocative comedy, Cavendish presents us with the delightful Lady Happy, whose determined efforts to avoid the pains of men and marriage lead her to construct a convent where women can devote themselves to enjoying life's pleasures. The women who retreat with her into the Convent of Pleasure are determined to avoid not only the dangers of men and marriage but also of childbirth and motherhood. Even so, they will not deny themselves the pleasures of love. Inside her convent, Lady Happy dares to imagine a radical alternative to marriage: since men and marriage cause only pain and suffering, perhaps a woman can fulfill her emotional and sexual desires with another woman. When she finds her soul's mate in a princess (rather than a prince), Lady Happy poses a critical question to herself and to us: "But why may not I love a woman with the same affection I could a man?" This Saltar's Point Press edition, designed for classroom use, provides readers with an ample introduction to Cavendish's life and work, a carefully modernized and well-presented text, helpful glosses and notes, a bibliography with references for further reading, and a chronology of Cavendish's published work.

Three Seventeenth Century Plays on Women and Performance

This is a groundbreaking edition of three seventeenth-century plays that all engage in diverse and exciting ways with questions of gender and performance.

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Author: John Fletcher

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719063388

Category: Drama

Page: 332

View: 869

This is a groundbreaking edition of three seventeenth-century plays that all engage in diverse and exciting ways with questions of gender and performance. The collection makes the texts of three much-discussed plays--John Fletcher's "The Wild-Goose Chase," James Shirley's "The Bird in a Cage," and Margaret Cavendish's "The Convent of Pleasure"--available together in a full scholarly edition for the first time.

Margaret Cavendish The Convent of Pleasure

Margaret told her mother she wanted to leave the Court. Her mother was adamant that she should stay and not disgrace herself by leaving. She provided additional funds for her to make life easier. Margaret remained.

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Author: MARGARET CAVENDISH.

Publisher: Stage Door

ISBN: 1787804119

Category:

Page: 42

View: 703

Margaret Lucas Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne was born in 1623 in Colchester, Essex into a family of comfortable means. As the youngest of eight children she spent much time with her siblings. Margaret had no formal education but she did have access to scholarly libraries and tutors, although she later said the children paid little attention to the tutors, who were there 'rather for formality than benefit'. From an early age Margaret was already assembling her thoughts for future works despite the then conditions of society that women did not partake in public authorship. For England it was also a time of Civil War. The Royalists were being pushed back and Parliamentary forces were in the ascendancy. Despite these obvious dangers, when Queen Henrietta Maria was in Oxford, Margaret asked her mother for permission to become one of her Ladies-in-waiting. She was accepted and, in 1644, accompanied the Queen into exile in France. This took her away from her family for the first time. Despite living at the Court of the young King Louis XIV, life for the young Margaret was not what she expected. She was far from her home and her confidence had been replaced by shyness and difficulties fitting in to the grandeur of her surroundings and the eminence of her company. Margaret told her mother she wanted to leave the Court. Her mother was adamant that she should stay and not disgrace herself by leaving. She provided additional funds for her to make life easier. Margaret remained. It was now also that she met and married William Cavendish who, at the time, was the Marquis of Newcastle (and later Duke). He was also 30 years her senior and previously married with two children. As Royalists, a return to life in England was not yet possible. They would remain in exile in Paris, Rotterdam and Antwerp until the restoration of the crown in 1660 although Margaret was able to return for attention to some estate matters. Along with her husband's brother, Sir Charles Cavendish, she travelled to England after having been told that her husband's estate (taken from him due to his being a royalist) was to be sold and that she, as his wife, would receive some benefit of the sale. She received nothing. She left England to be with her husband again. The couple were devoted to each other. Margaret wrote that he was the only man she was ever in love with, loving him not for title, wealth or power, but for merit, justice, gratitude, duty, and fidelity. She also relied upon him for support in her career. The marriage provided no children despite efforts made by her physician to overcome her inability to conceive. Margaret's first book, 'Poems and Fancies', was published in 1653; it was a collection of poems, epistles and prose pieces which explores her philosophical, scientific and aesthetic ideas. For a woman at this time writing and publishing were avenues they had great difficulty in pursuing. Added to this was Margaret's range of subjects. She wrote across a number of issues including gender, power, manners, scientific method, and philosophy. She always claimed she had too much time on her hands and was therefore able to indulge her love of writing. As a playwright she produced many works although most are as closet dramas. (This is a play not intended to be performed onstage, but instead read by a solitary reader or perhaps out loud in a small group. For Margaret the rigours of exile, her gender and Cromwell's closing of the theatres mean this was her early vehicle of choice and, despite these handicaps, she became one of the most well-known playwrights in England) Her utopian romance, 'The Blazing World', (1666) is one of the earliest examples of science fiction. Margaret also published extensively in natural philosophy and early modern science; at least a dozen books. She was the first woman to attend a meeting at Royal Society of London in 1667 and she critic

Paper Bodies

In addition to The Blazing World, this volume includes Cavendish’s brief autobiography, A True Relation of My Birth, Breeding and Life (1667), her play The Convent of Pleasure, and selections from her Sociable Letters, her poetry, and her ...

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Author: Margaret Cavendish

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN: 155111173X

Category: Fiction

Page: 332

View: 353

Margaret Cavendish was one of the most subversive and entertaining writers of the seventeenth century. She invented new genres, challenged gender roles, and critiqued the new science as well as the mores of society. “Paper Bodies” was the wonderful phrase she used to described her manuscripts, which she hoped would continue to make “a great Blazing Light” after her death. There are connections here to Cavendish’s most famous work, The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World (1666), a unique tale of a woman travelling through the north pole to a strange new world. In addition to The Blazing World, this volume includes Cavendish’s brief autobiography, A True Relation of My Birth, Breeding and Life (1667), her play The Convent of Pleasure, and selections from her Sociable Letters, her poetry, and her critical writings. A variety of background documents by other seventeenth-century writers helps to set her work in context for the modern reader.

The Female Academy

This new edition, designed for classroom use, provides an ample introduction to Cavendish and her work, a carefully modernized text, with helpful glosses and notes, and a useful bibliography with references for further reading.

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Author: Margaret Cavendish

Publisher:

ISBN: 0692853235

Category:

Page: 182

View: 930

When Margaret Cavendish published her first collection of dramatic work in 1662, she was keenly aware that none of her comedies or tragedies was unlikely to be acted, at least in her lifetime--but that did not deter her. "To those that do delight in scenes and wit / I dedicate my book," she writes at the beginning of the volume entitled, simply, "Plays." As for the hard reality that her plays were not to be produced? She has an answer for that as well: "For all the time my plays a-making were, / My brain the stage, my thoughts were acting there." "The Female Academy," the last play in her 1662 collection, opens with a fait accompli-a group of "old matrons" has established an educational institution devoted exclusively to the education of young women, "a house wherein a company of young ladies are instructed . . . to speak wittily and rationally, . . . to behave themselves handsomely, and to live virtuously." In this play, Cavendish presents the Female Academy as an institution created by women, inhabited solely by women, and operated for the benefit of women. The play also allows us to see the reactions of men, excluded from the Female Academy. Instead of ignoring the school, or wishing its young pupils well in their educational pursuits, men can't stay away-they hang around and spy on what's going on through "a large open grate" that allows them to hear the lectures being given inside. The play alternates scenes between the young women inside the Female Academy and the increasingly frustrated men in the outside world. This new edition, designed for classroom use, provides an ample introduction to Cavendish and her work, a carefully modernized text, with helpful glosses and notes, and a useful bibliography with references for further reading.

Paper Bodies

In addition to The Blazing World, this volume includes Cavendish’s brief autobiography, A True Relation of My Birth, Breeding and Life (1667), her play The Convent of Pleasure, and selections from her Sociable Letters, her poetry, and her ...

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Author: Margaret Cavendish

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN: 9781770487888

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 371

Margaret Cavendish was one of the most subversive and entertaining writers of the seventeenth century. She invented new genres, challenged gender roles, and critiqued the new science as well as the mores of society. “Paper Bodies” was the wonderful phrase she used to described her manuscripts, which she hoped would continue to make “a great Blazing Light” after her death. There are connections here to Cavendish’s most famous work, The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World (1666), a unique tale of a woman travelling through the north pole to a strange new world. In addition to The Blazing World, this volume includes Cavendish’s brief autobiography, A True Relation of My Birth, Breeding and Life (1667), her play The Convent of Pleasure, and selections from her Sociable Letters, her poetry, and her critical writings. A variety of background documents by other seventeenth-century writers helps to set her work in context for the modern reader.

Women on Stage in Stuart Drama

Dramas : Love's Labor's Lost and The Convent of Pleasure ' , SQ 47 ( 1996 ) , 387–95 . Chalmers explores the intertextual relationship between The Convent ...

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Author: Sophie Tomlinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521811112

Category: Drama

Page: 294

View: 156

Publisher description

Renaissance Drama 32

... and who entered the convent disguised as a princess, gives away the property that he obtains by marryingLady Happy—that is, the Convent of Pleasure—to ...

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Author: Jeffrey Masten

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 9780810119567

Category: Drama

Page: 264

View: 373

Renaissance Drama, an annual and interdisciplinary publication, is devoted to drama and performance as a central feature of Renaissance culture. The essays in each volume explore traditional canons of drama, the significance of performance (broadly construed) to early modern culture, and the impact of new forms of interpretation on the study of Renaissance plays, theatre, and performance.

The Convent of Measure

Although contemporary criticism of Margaret Cavendish's The Convent of Pleasure often focuses on Happy's convent as a site of queer resistance, my prosodic analysis of the verse structure of the 4.1 pastoral scene suggests that Lady Happy's ...

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Author: Seth Logan Swanner

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:846500945

Category: Electronic dissertations

Page: 74

View: 693

Although contemporary criticism of Margaret Cavendish's The Convent of Pleasure often focuses on Happy's convent as a site of queer resistance, my prosodic analysis of the verse structure of the 4.1 pastoral scene suggests that Lady Happy's convent is not defined negatively in relation to the patriarchy (as in resistance); rather, her convent is established to reflect her positively defined homoerotic desires. The Prince's successful infiltration of Happy's convent depends, then, upon not only his temporary rejection of patriarchal imperatives but also upon his assumption of the "feminine" discourse that Happy establishes as the discursive currency of her convent. The ways in which Happy delivers prose in scenes prior to 4.1 suggest that she prefers both content that glorifies nature and structure that demonstrates speed and poetic continuity. Likewise in the 4.1 scene, the disguised Prince delivers to Happy an erotic suit that succeeds because of its smooth, swift iambic trimeter form. The Prince's gender mimicry, then, extends beyond the standard adoption of cross-gendered clothing to an appropriation of positively defined, "feminine" ways of speaking. With this poetic gender mimicry, the Prince is able to infiltrate Happy's feminine utopia and collapse it from the inside by insinuating the patriarchal imperative of marriage into his otherwise feminine discourse. The poetic mode that Happy espouses represents a mode of feminine resistance that is borne out in Butlerian theories of gendered resistance. Happy's convent, then, characterizes a need to move beyond received (and largely inaccurate) notions of Butlerian performativity and to shift focus toward the more manageable terms of iteration and citation.

Cavendish and Shakespeare Interconnections

Cavendish's Convent of Pleasure follows Shakespeare in developing the banquet topos as a means of urging self-scrutiny, transformation, ...

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Author: Katherine Romack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351952965

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 279

Cavendish and Shakespeare, Interconnections explores the relationship between the plays of William Shakespeare and the writings of Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle (1623-1673). Cavendish wrote 25 plays in the 1650s and 60s, making her one of the most prolific playwrights”man or woman”of the seventeenth century. The essays contained in this volume fit together as studies of various sorts of influence, both literary and historical, setting Cavendish's appropriation of Shakespearean characters and plot structures within the context of the English Civil Wars and the Fronde. The essays trace Shakespeare's influence on Cavendish, explore the political implications of Cavendish's contribution to Shakespeare's reputation, and investigate the politics of influence more generally. The collection covers topics ranging from Cavendish's strategic use of Shakespeare to establish her own reputation to her adaptation of Shakespeare's martial imagery, moral philosophy, and marriage plots, as well as the conventions of cross dressing on stage. Other topics include Shakespeare and Cavendish read aloud; Cavendish's formally hybrid appropriation of Shakespearean comedy and tragedy; her transformation of Shakespearean women on trial; and her re-imagining of Shakespearean models of sexuality and pleasure.

Reading Early Modern Women

Margaret Cavendish , Duchess of Newcastle , The Convent of Pleasure ( 1668 ) , Ending revised by her husband , the Duke of Newcastle Sophie Tomlinson has ...

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Author: Helen Ostovich

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415966469

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 520

View: 588

This remarkable anthology assembles for the first time 144 primary texts and documents written by women between 1550 and 1700 and reveals an unprecedented view of the intellectual and literary lives of women in early modern England

Cavendish in the Cloister Repairing and Repurposing Female Monastic Experience in The Convent of Pleasure

Seventeenth-century English writers produced a number of texts that featured nuns and convents.

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Author: Nicole Stark

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:990144521

Category: British literature

Page: 148

View: 553

Seventeenth-century English writers produced a number of texts that featured nuns and convents. However, in a country that had been unwaveringly Protestant since 1558, why the preoccupation with a female figure that belonged to a religion long established as part of England’s past? In this thesis, I attempt to answer this question by examining one of the most intriguing and novel representations of the convent: Margaret Cavendish’s 1668 play The Convent of Pleasure. Previous writers in the period created sensational fabrications regarding the sexual and material excesses of nuns, and often with an eye to denigrating Catholic women and the church as a whole. Cavendish instead offered a secular convent that inverted many of these claims, turning nuns’ supposed indulgences into celebratory means of enriching women’s lives.