The Irish Diaspora in Britain 1750 1939

Thoroughly revised, updated and expanded, the new edition of this essential text broadens the analysis to 1939 and now features additional chapters on gender and the Irish diaspora in transnational perspective.

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Author: Donald M. MacRaild

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781137268037

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 944

Until the 1950s, the Irish were by far the largest ethnic minority in Britain. This leading study focuses on the most important phase of Irish migration, providing an analytical discussion of why and how the Irish settled in such numbers. The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 1750-1939, second edition: • examines key aspects of the social, religious and political worlds of these migrants • explores both Catholic and Protestant immigrants • explains why they were so often the victims of native hostility • adopts a truly Britain-wide approach • draws upon the latest research and a wide range of printed primary sources. Thoroughly revised, updated and expanded, the new edition of this essential text broadens the analysis to 1939 and now features additional chapters on gender and the Irish diaspora in transnational perspective.

The Irish Diaspora in Britain 1750 1939

Patrick O'Sullivan's monumental series on the Irish Diaspora contains many good essays on the British dimension: The Irish World Wide: History, Heritage, ...

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Author: Donald M. MacRaild

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781137267566

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 418

Until the 1950s, the Irish were by far the largest ethnic minority in Britain. This leading study focuses on the most important phase of Irish migration, providing an analytical discussion of why and how the Irish settled in such numbers. The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 1750-1939, second edition: • examines key aspects of the social, religious and political worlds of these migrants • explores both Catholic and Protestant immigrants • explains why they were so often the victims of native hostility • adopts a truly Britain-wide approach • draws upon the latest research and a wide range of printed primary sources. Thoroughly revised, updated and expanded, the new edition of this essential text broadens the analysis to 1939 and now features additional chapters on gender and the Irish diaspora in transnational perspective.

Women and Irish diaspora identities

See D. M. MacRaild, The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), pp. 141–57. 8 For an example of the focus on ...

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Author: D. A. J. MacPherson

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781526112408

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 239

Bringing together leading authorities on Irish women and migration, this book offers a significant reassessment of the place of women in the Irish diaspora. It compares Irish women across the globe over the last two centuries, setting this research in the context of recent theoretical developments in the study of diaspora. This collection demonstrates the important role played by women in the construction of Irish diasporic identities, assessing Irish women’s experience in Britain, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. This book develops a conversation between other locations of the Irish diaspora and the dominant story about the USA and, in the process, emphasises the complexity and heterogeneity of Irish diasporan locations and experiences. This interdisciplinary collection, featuring chapters by Breda Gray, Louise Ryan and Bronwen Walter, will appeal to scholars and students of the Irish diaspora and women’s migration.

Ireland and the Irish in Interwar England

the case of the Irish in interwar England existed at the intersection of two ... The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, ...

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Author: Mo Moulton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107052680

Category: History

Page: 378

View: 341

This social history argues that the relocation of Irishness from politics to personal and civic life underpinned England's interwar stability.

Periodizing Secularization

The major histories of the Irish diaspora in Britain consider interactions with the ... 2000); idem, The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939, second edn.

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Author: Clive D. Field

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198848806

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 354

Moving beyond the (now somewhat tired) debates about secularization as paradigm, theory, or master narrative, Periodizing Secularization focuses upon the empirical evidence for secularization, viewed in its descriptive sense as the waning social influence of religion, in Britain. Particular emphasis is attached to the two key performance indicators of religious allegiance and churchgoing, each subsuming several sub-indicators, between 1880 and 1945, including the first substantive account of secularization during the fin de siecle. A wide range of primary sources is deployed, many of them relatively or entirely unknown, and with due regard to their methodological and interpretative challenges. On the back of them, a cross-cutting statistical measure of 'active church adherence' is devised, which clearly shows how secularization has been a reality and a gradual, not revolutionary, process. The most likely causes of secularization were an incremental demise of a Sabbatarian culture (coupled with the associated emergence of new leisure opportunities and transport links) and of religious socialization (in the church, at home, and in the school). The analysis is also extended backwards, to include a summary of developments during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries; and laterally, to incorporate a preliminary evaluation of a six-dimensional model of 'diffusive religion', demonstrating that these alternative performance indicators have hitherto failed to prove that secularization has not occurred. The book is designed as a prequel to the author's previous volumes on the chronology of British secularization - Britain's Last Religious Revival? (2015) and Secularization in the Long 1960s (2017). Together, they offer a holistic picture of religious transformation in Britain during the key secularizing century of 1880-1980.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

Mary J. hickman, 'alternative historiographies of the irish in Britain: a ... Macraild, donald M., The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (2nd ed., ...

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Author: Alvin Jackson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199549344

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 599

Draws from a wide range of disciplines to bring together 36 leading scholars writing about 400 years of modern Irish history

Britain at Bay

Laura K. Donohue, 'Regulating Northern Ireland: The Special Powers Acts, ... Donald M. MacRaild, The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939, London, Palgrave, ...

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Author: Alan Allport

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 9780451494757

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 263

A sweeping, groundbreaking epic that combines military with social history, to illuminate the ways in which Great Britain and its people were permanently transformed by the Second World War. Here is the many-faceted, world-historically significant story of Britain at war. In looking closely at the military and political dimensions of the conflict's first crucial years, Alan Allport tackles questions such as: Could the war have been avoided? Could it have been lost? Were the strategic decisions the rights ones? How well did the British organize and fight? How well did the British live up to their own values? What difference did the war make in the end to the fate of the nation? In answering these and other essential questions he focuses on the human contingencies of the war, weighing directly at the roles of individuals and the outcomes determined by luck or chance. Moreover, he looks intimately at the changes in wartime British society and culture. Britain at Bay draws on a large cast of characters--from the leading statesmen and military commanders who made the decisions, to the ordinary men, women, and children who carried them out and lived through their consequences--in a comprehensible and compelling single history of forty-six million people. For better or worse, much of Britain today is ultimately the product of the experiences of 1938-1941.

The Cambridge Social History of Modern Ireland

Foster, R. F. Paddy and Mr Punch: connections in Irish and English history (London, ... MacRaild, D. The Irish diaspora in Britain 17501939 (London, 2010).

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Author: Eugenio F. Biagini

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108228626

Category: History

Page:

View: 469

Covering three centuries of unprecedented demographic and economic changes, this textbook is an authoritative and comprehensive view of the shaping of Irish society, at home and abroad, from the famine of 1740 to the present day. The first major work on the history of modern Ireland to adopt a social history perspective, it focuses on the experiences and agency of Irish men, women and children, Catholics and Protestants, and in the North, South and the diaspora. An international team of leading scholars survey key changes in population, the economy, occupations, property ownership, class and migration, and also consider the interaction of the individual and the state through welfare, education, crime and policing. Drawing on a wide range of disciplinary approaches and consistently setting Irish developments in a wider European and global context, this is an invaluable resource for courses on modern Irish history and Irish studies.

Irish London

In recent years, scholars working in the vibrant field of Irish Diaspora Studies ... The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939, 2nd edn (Basingstoke, 2011).

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Author: Craig Bailey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781846318818

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 995

The familiar story of Irish migration to London during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is one of severe poverty, hardship, and marginalization. But many Irish immigrants were middle class and had a vastly different experience within the global metropolis. Detailing studies of Irish lawyers, students, and merchants who moved to London during this period, Irish Londonoverturns assumptions of easy assimilation that have led to scholarly neglect of this group, showing the ways that they depended on Irish culture—and a connection to it—to overcome the ordinary challenges of day-to-day life. In doing so, it offers a new perspective on the unique and tangible value of Irish culture for the many Irish who would call another country home.

Ribbon Societies in Nineteenth Century Ireland and its Diaspora

Britain and the USa bore the brunt of these Famine emigrations; however, ... 2 Donald M. MacRaild, The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (Basingstoke, ...

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Author: Kyle Hughes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781786949387

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 807

This is the first full-length study of Irish Ribbonism, tracing the development of the movement from its origins in the Defender movement of the 1790s to the latter part of the century when the remnants of the Ribbon tradition found solace in a new movement: the quasi-constitutional affinities of the Ancient Order of Hibernians. Placing Ribbonism firmly within Ireland's long tradition of collective action and protest, this book shows that, owing to its diversity and adaptability, it shared similarities, but also stood apart from, the many rural redresser groups of the period and showed remarkable longevity not matched by its contemporaries. The book describes the wider context of Catholic struggles for improved standing, explores traditions and networks for association, and it describes external impressions. Drawing on rich archives in the form of state surveillance records, 'show trial' proceedings and press reportage, the book shows that Ribbonism was a sophisticated and durable underground network drawing together various strands of the rural and urban Catholic populace in Ireland and Britain. Ribbon Societies in Nineteenth-Century Ireland and its Diaspora is a fascinating study that demonstrates Ribbonism operated more widely than previous studies have revealed.

English Ethnicity and Culture in North America

Donald M. MacRaild, The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2010), chap. 7. 13. Robert Ernst, Immigrant Life in New York, ...

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Author: David T. Gleeson

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 9781611177879

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 893

To many, English immigrants contributed nothing substantial to the varied palette of ethnicity in North America. While there is wide recognition of German American, French American, African American, and Native American cultures, discussion of English Americans as a distinct ethnic group is rare. Yet the historians writing in English Ethnicity and Culture in North America show that the English were clearly immigrants too in a strange land, adding their own hues to the American and Canadian characters. In this collection, editor David T. Gleeson and other contributors explore some of the continued links between England, its people, and its culture with North America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These essays challenge the established view of the English having no "ethnicity," highlighting the vibrancy of the English and their culture in North America. The selections also challenge the prevailing notion of the English as "invisible immigrants." Recognizing the English as a distinct ethnic group, similar to the Irish, Scots, and Germans, also has implications for understanding American identity by providing a clearer picture of how Americans often have defined themselves in the context of Old World cultural traditions. Several contributors to English Ethnicity and Culture in North America track the English in North America from Episcopal pulpits to cricket fields and dance floors. For example Donald M. MacRaild and Tanja Bueltmann explore the role of St. George societies before and after the American Revolution in asserting a separate English identity across class boundaries. In addition Kathryn Lamontagne looks at English ethnicity in the working-class culture and labor union activities of workers in Fall River, Massachusetts. Ultimately all the work included here challenges the idea of a coherent, comfortable Anglo-cultural mainstream and indicates the fluid and adaptable nature of what it meant and means to be English in North America.

British and Irish diasporas

26 Boston Liberator, 25 March 1842; Bruce Nelson, Irish Nationalists and the Making of ... The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (Basingstoke, 2010), pp.

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Author: Donald MacRaild

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781526127877

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 684

People from the British and Irish Isles have, for centuries, migrated to all corners of the globe.Wherever they went, the English, Irish, Scots, Welsh, and and even sub-national, supra-regional groups like the Cornish, co-mingled, blended and blurred. Yet while they gradually integrated into new lives in far-flung places, British and Irish Isle emigrants often maintained elements of their distinctive national cultures, which is an important foundation of diasporas. Within this wider context, this volume seeks to explore the nature and characteristics of the British and Irish diasporas, stressing their varying origins and evolution, the developing attachments to them, and the differences in each nation’s recognition of their own diaspora. The volume thus offers the first integrated study of the formation of diasporas from the islands of Ireland and Britain, with a particular view to scrutinizing the similarities, differences, tensions and possibilities of this approach.

The Discourse of Repatriation in Britain 1845 2016

Because Ireland was so close, and return to Britain so doable, repatriation was not ... 4 Donald Macraild, The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939, ...

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Author: Daniel Renshaw

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429018657

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 722

Examining responses to migration and settlement in Britain from the Irish Famine up to Brexit, The Discourse of Repatriation looks at how concepts of removal evolved in this period, and the varied protagonists who have articulated these ideas in different contexts. Analysing the relationship between discourse and action, Renshaw explores how ideas and language originating on the peripheries of debate on migration and belonging can permeate the mainstream and transform both discussion and policy. The book sheds light both on how the migrant ‘other’ has been viewed in Britain, historically and contemporaneously, and more broadly how the relationship between state, press, and populace has developed from the early Victorian period onwards. It identifies key junctures where the concept of the removal of ‘othered’ groups has crossed over from the rhetorical to the actual, and considers why this was the case. Based on extensive original archival research, the book reassesses modern British history through the lens of the most polarised attitudes to immigration and demographic change. This book will be of use to readers with an interest in migration, diaspora, the development of populism and political extremes, and more broadly the history of modern Britain.

Socialism and the Diasporic Other

A Comparative Study of Irish Catholic and Jewish Radical and Communal ... The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, ...

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Author: Daniel Renshaw

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781786948755

Category: History

Page: 285

View: 337

The late-Victorian and Edwardian East End was an area not only defined by its poverty and destitution, but also by its ethnic and religious diversity. In the neighbourhoods of East London diasporic communities interacted with each other and with the host society in a number of different contexts. In Socialism and the Diasporic 'Other' Daniel Renshaw examines the sometimes turbulent relationships formed between Irish Catholic and Jewish populations and the socialist and labour organisations agitating in the area. Employing a comparative perspective, the book analyses the complex relations between working class migrants, conservative communal hierarchies and revolutionary groups. Commencing and concluding with waves of widespread industrial action in the East End, where politics were conflated with ethnic and diasporic identity, this book aims to reinterpret the attitudes of the turn-of-the-century East London Left towards 'difference'. Concerned with both protecting hard-won gains for the industrial proletariat and championing marginalised minority groups, the 'correct' path to be taken by socialist movements was unclear throughout the period. The book simultaneously compares the experiences of the Irish and Jewish working classes between 1889 and 1912, and the relationships formed, at work, at worship, in political organisations or at school, between these diasporic groups.

Reading the Irish Woman

MacRaild, Donald M., The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (Basingstoke: palgrave, 2011). Macardle, Dorothy, 'Experiment in Ireland', ...

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Author: Gerardine Meaney

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781781388198

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 852

The theme of this book is cultural encounter and exchange in Irish women's lives. Using three case studies: the Enlightenment, emigration and modernism, it analyses reading and popular and consumer culture as sites of negotiation of gender roles. It traces how the circulation of ideas, fantasies and aspirations which have shaped women's lives in actuality and in imagination and argues that there were many different ways of being a woman. Attention to women's cultural consumption and production shows that one individual may in one day identify with representations of heroines of romantic fiction, patriots, philanthropists, literary ladies, film stars, career women, popular singers, advertising models and foreign missionaries. The processes of cultural consumption, production and exchange provide evidence of women's agency, aspirations and activities within and far beyond the domestic sphere.

Locating the English Diaspora 1500 2010

His most recent book is The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (Macmillan, 2010), which is a revised, expanded and extended edition of his 1999 study of ...

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Author: Tanja Bueltmann

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9781846318191

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 771

After 1600, English emigration became one of Europe’s most significant population movements. Yet compared to what has been written about the migration of Scots and Irish, relatively little energy has been expended on the numerically more significant English flows. Whilst the Scottish, Irish, German, Italian, Jewish and Black Diasporas are well known and much studied, there is virtual silence on the English. Why, then, is there no English Diaspora? Why has little been said about the English other than to map their main emigration flows? Did the English simply disappear into the host population? Or were they so fundamental, and foundational, to the Anglophone, Protestant cultures of the evolving British World that they could not be distinguished in the way Catholic Irish or continental Europeans were? With contributions from the UK, Europe North America and Australasia that examine themes as wide-ranging as Yorkshire societies in New Zealand and St George’s societies in Montreal, to Anglo-Saxonism in the Atlantic World and the English Diaspora of the sixteenth century, this international collection explores these and related key issues about the nature and character of English identity during the creation of the cultures of the wider British World. It does not do so uncritically. Several of the authors deal with and accept the invisibility of the English, while others take the opposite view. The result is a lively collection which combines reaffirmations of some existing ideas with fresh empirical research, and groundbreaking new conceptualisations.

Scots in Victorian and Edwardian Belfast

bound Belfast, Ulster, and Ireland with Scotland and England in the nineteenth century and ... The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (Basingstoke, 2011), ...

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Author: Kyle Hughes

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748679935

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 512

A new departure in Scottish and Irish migration studiesThe Scottish diasporic communities closest to home-those which are part of what we sometimes term the 'near Diaspora'-are those we know least about. Whilst an interest in the overseas Scottish diaspora has grown in recent years, Scots who chose to settle in other parts of the United Kingdom have been largely neglected. This book addresses this imbalance.Scots travelled freely around the industrial centres of northern Britain throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and Belfast was one of the most important ports of call for thousands of Scots. The Scots played key roles in shaping Belfast society in the modern period: they were essential to its industrial development; they were at the centre of many cultural, philanthropic and religious initiatives and were welcomed by the host community accordingly.Yet despite their obvious significance, in staunchly Protestant, Unionist, and at times insular and ill at ease Belfast, individual Scots could be viewed with suspicion by their hosts, dismissed as 'strangers' and cast in the role of interfering outsiders.Key FeaturesThe only book-length scholarly study of the Scots in modern Ireland.Brings to light the fundamental importance of Scottish migration to Belfast society during the nineteenth century.Advances our knowledge and understanding of Scotland's 'near diaspora.'Highlights areas of tension in Ulster-Scottish relations during the Home Rule era.Puts forward a new agenda for a better understanding of British in-migration to Ireland in the modern period.

The Cambridge History of Ireland Volume 3 1730 1880

MacRaild, D.M., The Irish diaspora in Britain, 17501939, 2nd edn (New York: St. Martinʼs Press, 2011). McCarthy, A., Irish migrants in New Zealand, ...

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Author: James Kelly

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108340403

Category: History

Page:

View: 725

The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was an era of continuity as well as change. Though properly portrayed as the era of 'Protestant Ascendancy' it embraces two phases - the eighteenth century when that ascendancy was at its peak; and the nineteenth century when the Protestant elite sustained a determined rear-guard defence in the face of the emergence of modern Catholic nationalism. Employing a chronology that is not bound by traditional datelines, this volume moves beyond the familiar political narrative to engage with the economy, society, population, emigration, religion, language, state formation, culture, art and architecture, and the Irish abroad. It provides new and original interpretations of a critical phase in the emergence of a modern Ireland that, while focused firmly on the island and its traditions, moves beyond the nationalist narrative of the twentieth century to provide a history of late early modern Ireland for the twenty-first century.

Traveling Irishness in the Long Nineteenth Century

Nicholas Canny (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994), 113–149; Donald M. MacRaild, The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (1999; Basingstoke and New York: ...

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Author: Marguérite Corporaal

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319525273

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 258

View: 463

Exploring the effects of traveling, migration, and other forms of cultural contact, particularly within Europe, this edited collection explores the act of traveling and the representation of traveling by Irish men and women from diverse walks of life in the period between Grattan’s Parliament (1782) and World War I (1914). This was a period marked by an increasing physical and cultural mobility of Irish throughout Britain, Continental Europe, the Americas, and the Pacific. Travel was undertaken for a variety of reasons: during the Romantic period, the ‘Grand Tour’ and what is now sometimes referred to as medical tourism brought Irish artists and intellectuals to Europe, where cultural exchanges with other writers, artists, and thinkers inspired them to introduce novel ideas and cultural forms to their Irish audiences. Showing this impact of the nineteenth-century Irish across national borders and their engagement with global cultural and linguistic traditions, the volume will provide novel insights into the transcultural spheres of the arts, literature, politics, and translation in which they were active.

Migrant Britain

1, 2005, 115–133 and Donald MacRaild, The Irish diaspora in Britain, 17501939 (Basingstoke: Palgrave 2010) and The Irish in Britain, 1800–1914 (Dublin: ...

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Author: Jennifer Craig-Norton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351661072

Category: History

Page: 324

View: 286

Britain has largely been in denial of its migrant past - it is often suggested that the arrivals after 1945 represent a new phenomenon and not the continuation of a much longer and deeper trend. There is also an assumption that Britain is a tolerant country towards minorities that distinguishes itself from the rest of Europe and beyond. The historian who was the first and most important to challenge this dominant view is Colin Holmes, who, from the early 1970s onwards, provided a framework for a different interpretation based on extensive research. This challenge came not only through his own work but also that of a 'new school' of students who studied under him and the creation of the journal Immigrants and Minorities in 1982. This volume not only celebrates this remarkable achievement, but also explores the state of migrant historiography (including responses to migrants) in the twenty-first century.