The Parihaka Cult

Dr Kerry Bolton delves deeply into the huge body of extant historical documentation, contemporary to Parihaka's founding prophet, and lays the entire, lame-fantasy bare for all to see." --Publisher description.

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Author: Kerry Raymond Bolton

Publisher:

ISBN: 1908476559

Category: Maori (New Zealand people)

Page: 125

View: 100

"The 'colonial invasion' of Parihaka in 1881 and the arrest of its self-styled 'prophets' Te Whiti and Tohu, have become a major part of the New Zealand narrative that has been revised to inculcate a guilt complex into European, especially British-descended, New Zealanders in the interests of tribal agendas. As such, the Parihaka legend ranks alongside America's 'Wounded Knee' and South Africa's 'Sharpeville' as part of a world-wide offensive against the past, present and future of European-descended peoples. Dr Kerry Bolton delves deeply into the huge body of extant historical documentation, contemporary to Parihaka's founding prophet, and lays the entire, lame-fantasy bare for all to see." --Publisher description.

The Parihaka Cult

Dr Kerry Bolton delves deeply into the huge body of extant historical documentation, contemporary to Parihaka's founding prophet, and lays the entire, lame-fantasy bare for all to see.

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Author: Kerry Bolton

Publisher: Black House Publishing

ISBN: 1910881686

Category: History

Page: 136

View: 315

'The events that took place in and around Parihaka particularly from about 1860 to 1900 have affected the political, cultural and spiritual dynamics of the entire country'. - Human Rights Commission, 2010 Over the past forty-years or so, we in New Zealand have watched our history being systematically re-invented, not based upon documented evidence of real-events that actually occurred on the ground, but solely to serve a modern-day need for made-to-order propaganda. One of the foremost of the churned-out, manufactured-myths surrounds the mid-19th century creation of a cultist-community called 'Parihaka', now represented, in typical Marxist-speak, as some kind of a Gandhi-inspiring bastion of righteousness and (yawn) passive-resistance against imperialist tyranny. The 'colonial invasion' of Parihaka in 1881 and the arrest of its self-styled 'prophets' Te Whiti and Tohu, have become a major part of the New Zealand narrative that has been revised to inculcate a guilt complex into European, especially British-descended, New Zealanders in the interests of tribal agendas. As such, the Parihaka legend ranks alongside America's 'Wounded Knee' and South Africa's 'Sharpeville' as part of a world-wide offensive against the past, present and future of European-descended peoples. Dr Kerry Bolton delves deeply into the huge body of extant historical documentation, contemporary to Parihaka's founding prophet, and lays the entire, lame-fantasy bare for all to see.

Decolonisation and the Pacific

Autonomy movements, occasionally termed 'cargo' and 'millenarian' 'cults', ... 4; Kerry Bolton, 'The Parihaka Cult', Journal of Anthropology 7:1 (2011): ...

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Author: Tracey Banivanua Mar

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316683989

Category: History

Page:

View: 122

This book charts the previously untold story of decolonisation in the oceanic world of the Pacific, Australia and New Zealand, presenting it both as an indigenous and an international phenomenon. Tracey Banivanua Mar reveals how the inherent limits of decolonisation were laid bare by the historical peculiarities of colonialism in the region, and demonstrates the way imperial powers conceived of decolonisation as a new form of imperialism. She shows how Indigenous peoples responded to these limits by developing rich intellectual, political and cultural networks transcending colonial and national borders, with localised traditions of protest and dialogue connected to the global ferment of the twentieth century. The individual stories told here shed new light on the forces that shaped twentieth-century global history, and reconfigure the history of decolonisation, presenting it not as an historic event, but as a fragile, contingent and ongoing process continuing well into the postcolonial era.

Parihaka

NOTES RUAKERE HOND THE CONCEPT OF WĀNANGA AT PARIHAKA 1 R. Benton and N. Benton , The Unbroken ... 14 Also referred to as the Hauhau movement or cult .

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Author: Te Miringa Hohaia

Publisher: Victoria University Press

ISBN: 0864735200

Category: Art

Page: 232

View: 319

"Drawing on previously unpublished manuscripts, many of the teachings and sayings of Te Whiti and Tohu - in Maori and English - are reproduced in full with extensive annotation by Te Miringa Hohaia. Parihaka: The Art of Passive Resistance reaches beyond the art and literary worlds to engage with cultural issues important to all citizens of Aotearoa New Zealand."--Jacket.

Journal Appendix

Was that reserve intended to be left without being sectionized ? ... Anderson during the absence of the Natives at Parihaka , until it reached close to the ...

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Author: New Zealand. Parliament. House of Representatives

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:C2628306

Category:

Page:

View: 774

Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives of New Zealand

Was that reserve intended to be left without being sectionized ? ... by Mr. Anderson during the absence of the Natives at Parihaka , until it reached close ...

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Author: New Zealand. Parliament. House of Representatives

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:C2686174

Category: New Zealand

Page:

View: 826

APPENDIX TO THE JOURNALS

The Ngamahangas of Pun never drawn into the Parihaka cult , but followed a local seer , now happily defunct . In bi they devoted themselves to education ...

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Author: New Zealand. Legislature. House of Representatives

Publisher:

ISBN: UIUC:30112033642791

Category: New Zealand

Page:

View: 979

Among friends

The anti-missionary Papahurihia cult, the Pai Marire or Hauhau cult, ... Maori resistance movement that had formed around the Parihaka“ community, ...

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Author: Agnes Brandt

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 9783847000600

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 291

View: 277

Freundschaft verbindet. Wie die Autorin zeigt, gilt dies im antiken Griechenland ebenso wie im heutigen Neuseeland. Basierend auf stationären Feldforschungsaufenthalten in Neuseeland widmet sich die ethnographische Fallstudie den lokalspezifischen Konzeptionen und Alltagspraktiken von Freundschaft in ihrem weiteren gesellschaftlichen Kontext. Vor dem Hintergrund der aktuellen Identitätsdebatten und Diskurse um Bi- und/oder Multikulturalismus werden die »Freundschaftswelten« von Maori (die Angehörigen der indigenen Bevölkerung) und Pakeha (die Nachfahren der vornehmlich europäischen Siedlerpopulation) Akteuren in ihrem jeweiligen sozialen Umfeld in den Blick genommen. Die Arbeit versteht sich als Beitrag zu den aktuellen Debatten um Sozialität und Identität sowie Indigenität und Diversität ebenso wie zur Entwicklung ethnologischer Perspektiven auf das Phänomen Freundschaft – dieser flexiblen Sozialform, die einen immer wichtigeren Platz in den Lebenswelten der Menschen einnimmt.

History of the Taranaki Region

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

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Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230837302

Category:

Page: 30

View: 697

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 28. Chapters: Taranaki land wars, Parihaka, Second Taranaki War, First Taranaki War, Titokowaru's War, History of New Plymouth, Patea Freezing Works, Taranaki Province, Taranaki Waste Lands Board. Excerpt: Parihaka is a small community in Taranaki Region, New Zealand, located between Mount Taranaki and the Tasman Sea. In the 1870s and 1880s the settlement, then reputed to be the largest M ori village in New Zealand, became the centre of a major campaign of non-violent resistance to European occupation of confiscated land in the area. The village was founded in 1867 by M ori prophets Te Whiti o Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi on land seized by the government during the post-war land confiscations of the 1860s.Tohu was a member of the messianic Hauhau cult who believed that if they chanted and raised there right hand they were bulletproof.Hau hau were also cannibals who believed in dismembering their victims while alive.Tohu took part in an attack on a British stockade in Taranaki, which resulted in most of the Hau hau being killed. Recognising the destructive effects of war, Te Whiti and Tohu declared they would use spiritual powers rather than weapons to claim their right to live on land they had occupied for centuries. The population of the village grew to more than 2000, impressing European visitors with its cleanliness and industry, and its extensive cultivations producing cash crops as well as food sufficient to feed its inhabitants. When an influx of European settlers in Taranaki created a demand for farmland that outstripped the availability, the Grey government stepped up efforts to secure title to land it had confiscated but subsequently not taken up for settlement. M ori near Parihaka and the Waimate Plains rejected their payments, however, and the government responded by drawing up plans to take the land by force. In late...

A Simple Nullity

The Parihaka resistance to colonial confiscations of land has had more than a ... and the host of Maori prophets, millennial movements and healing cults.

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Author: David V. Williams

Publisher: Auckland University Press

ISBN: 9781869407445

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 858

David V. Williams takes a fresh look at the notorious Wi Parata case - the protagonists, the origins of the dispute, the years of legal back and forth - affording new insights into both Maori-Pakeha relations in the nineteenth century and the legal position of the Treaty of Waitangi. In 1877, the New Zealand Supreme Court decided a case, Wi Parata v Bishop of Wellington, that centred on the ownership and use of the Whitireia Block, near Porirua. Ngati Toa had given this land to the Anglican Church for a college that was never built. In the course of refusing to inquire into the ownership of the block, the judges dismissed the relevance of the Treaty of Waitangi: 'So far indeed as that instrument purported to cede the sovereignty - a matter with which we are not directly concerned - it must be regarded as a simple nullity.' Over the past twenty-five years, judges, lawyers and commentators have castigated this 'simple nullity' view of the Treaty. The 'infamous' case has been seen as symbolic of the neglect of Maori rights by settlers, government and the law in New Zealand. The factual background to the Wi Parata case, Williams argues, tells us much about nineteenth-century Maori acting as they thought best for their people and about debates in Pakeha jurisprudence over the recognition or rejection of customary Maori rights. Behind the apparent dismissal of the Treaty as a 'simple nullity' lay deep arguments about the place of Maori and Pakeha in Aotearoa New Zealand. Those arguments are as relevant now as they were then

At the Margin of Empire

Like Ani Karo, Rēmana Hi had links to Parihaka, but the new sect shut itself off from outsiders and retreated to an exclusive settlement known as Mt Zion, ...

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Author: Jennifer Ashton

Publisher: Auckland University Press

ISBN: 9781775587781

Category: Art

Page: 276

View: 224

Born in Scotland in 1818, John Webster came to New Zealand via Australia in 1841 (after a violent encounter in the outback which he just escaped unscathed) and spent most of the rest of his life in Hokianga. At the Margin of Empire charts his colourful experiences carving out a fortune as the region's leading timber trader and cultivating connections with the leading figures of the day, Maori and Pakeha. Webster fought alongside Tamati Waka Nene in the Northern War, married one of Nene's relatives and built up his kauri timber business through trade with local chiefs (though at one point awoke to find a plundering party had arrived on his front lawn). He was also friends with Frederick Maning, and visited by George Grey, Richard Seddon and other luminaries of the day.

The Treaty of Waitangi

... 213 Papahia, 25 Papahurihia (Ngakahi) cult, 32 Parihaka, 183, 188, 189 Parliamentary Report on New Zealand, 1844, 98, 119, 122, 127 parliaments, Māori, ...

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Author: Claudia Orange

Publisher: Bridget Williams Books

ISBN: 9781877242489

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 996

"The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 by over 500 chiefs, and by William Hobson, representing the British Crown. To the British it was the means by which they gained sovereignty over New Zealand. But to Maori people it had a very different significance, and they are still affected by the terms of the Treaty, often adversely.The Treaty of Waitangi, the first comprehensive study of the Treaty, deals with its place in New Zealand history from its making to the present day. The story covers the several Treaty signings and the substantial differences between Maori and English texts; the debate over interpretation of land rights and the actions of settler governments determined to circumvent Treaty guarantees; the wars of sovereignty in the 1860s and the longstanding Maori struggle to secure a degree of autonomy and control over resources." --Publisher.

The New New Zealand

Interestingly, Jonathan Z. Smith's approach located the Io cult at neither end ... Te Ua's successors who founded the pacifist community of Parihaka in the ...

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Author: William Edward Moneyhun

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476638348

Category: History

Page: 251

View: 132

Today's New Zealand is an emerging paradigm for successful cultural relations. Although the nation's Maori (indigenous Polynesian) and Pakeha (colonial European) populations of the 19th century were dramatically different and often at odds, they are today co-contributors to a vibrant society. For more than a century they have been working out the kind of nation that engenders respect and well-being; and their interaction, though often riddled with confrontation, is finally bearing bicultural fruit. By their model, the encounter of diverse cultures does not require the surrender of one to the other; rather, it entails each expanding its own cultural categories in the light of the other. The time is ripe to explore modern New Zealand's cultural dynamics for what we can learn about getting along. The present anthropological work focuses on religion and related symbols, forms of reciprocity, the operation of power and the concept of culture in modern New Zealand society.

Conflict and Compromise

Te Whiti's village , Parihaka , had a fife and drum band and the players wore ... sees the ' religious flavour ' of cult movements as stemming from the ...

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Author: Ian Hugh Kawharu

Publisher: Wellington : A. H. & A. W. Reed

ISBN: UOM:39015027035982

Category: Maori (New Zealand people)

Page: 219

View: 879

"Conflict and Compromise represents a landmark in considering race relations in New Zealand just prior to the current Treaty of Waitangi settlement process. Contributions by eight leading academics, including Michael Jackson, Gilda Misur and Ranginui Walker are brought together by the distinguished leader of Ngati Whatua, Sir Hugh Kawharu, to provide case studies of conflicts and compromises in relations between Maori and Pakeha. Topics include literacy in the nineteenth century, Maori prophet movements, aspects of early development, Maori work behaviour, Maori religion in the city suburbs, and race relations in timber towns"--Publisher's description.

A Maori Community in Northland

... Ngaapuhi who had gone to Parihaka , Te Whiti's stronghold . This adjustment cult gained a hold in this portion of Hokianga , but did not affect Waima .

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Author: Patrick W. Hohepa

Publisher: Raupo

ISBN: UVA:X000278451

Category: Maori (New Zealand people)

Page: 142

View: 253

Bulletin

... Ngaapuhi who had gone to Parihaka , Te Whiti's stronghold . This adjustment cult gained a hold in this portion of Hokianga , but did not affect Waima .

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Author: University of Auckland. Dept. of Anthropology

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015039776276

Category: Anthropology

Page:

View: 538

Hauhau

SCOTT, R. G. The Parihaka Story, Auckland, 1954. SINCLAIR, K. A History of New Zealand, ... A Study of 'Cargo' Cults in Melanesia, 2nd ed., London, 1968.

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Author: Paul Clark

Publisher: Auckland University Press

ISBN: 9781869406479

Category: Political Science

Page: 196

View: 687

To most New Zealanders, the word 'Hauhau' conjures up a picture of bloodthirsty fanaticism. This book, the definitive study of the Pai Marire or 'Hauhau' Maori movement in the 1860s, presents a different view. Pai Marire is shown as being a search for ways of meeting European settlement and domination, and of using European skills and literacy, on Maori terms and without compromising Maori identity. Sources include the Ua Rongopai notebook, which contains a record of the words of Te Ua Haumene, the prophet of Pai Marire, himself.

The Oxford History of the British Empire Volume III The Nineteenth Century

... and Tawhiao, thesecond Maori King, whostarted the Tariao sect in 1875, ... Parihaka became a wellorganized centre for Maori from a number oftribes and ...

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Author: Andrew Porter

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191647680

Category: History

Page: 800

View: 313

The Oxford History of the British Empire is a major new assessment of the Empire in the light of recent scholarship and the progressive opening of historical records. From the founding of colonies in North America and the West Indies in the seventeenth century to the reversion of Hong Kong to China at the end of the twentieth, British imperialism was a catalyst for far-reaching change. The Oxford History of the British Empire as a comprehensive study helps us to understand the end of Empire in relation to its beginning, the meaning of British imperialism for the ruled as well as for the rulers, and the significance of the British Empire as a theme in world history. Volume III of The Oxford History of the British Empire covers the long nineteenth century, from the achievement of American independence in the 1780s to the eve of world war in 1914. This was the period of Britain's greatest expansion as both empire-builder and dominant world power. The volume is divided into two parts. The first contains thematic chapters, some focusing on Britain, others on areas at the imperial periphery, exploring those fundamental dynamics of British expansion whcih made imperial influence and rule possible. They also examine the economic, cultural, and institutional frameworks whcih gave shape to Britain's overseas empire. Part 2 is devoted to the principal areas of imperial activity overseas, including both white settler and tropical colonies. Chapters examine how British interests and imperial rule shaped individual regions' nineteenth-century political and socio-economic history. Themes dealt with include the economics of empire, imperial institutions, defence, technology, imperial and colonial cultures, science and exploration. Attention is given not only to the formal empire, from Australasia and the West Indies to India and the African colonies, but also to China and Latin America, often regarded as central components of a British `informal empire'.