The Yajur Veda Taittiriya Sanhita

The Yajurveda (Sanskrit यजुर्वेदः yajurveda, a tatpurusha compound of yajus "sacrificial formula', + veda "knowledge") is the third of the four canonical texts of Hinduism, the Vedas.

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Author: Arthur Berriedale Keith

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ISBN: 9798609289070

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Page: 443

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The Yajurveda (Sanskrit यजुर्वेदः yajurveda, a tatpurusha compound of yajus "sacrificial formula', + veda "knowledge") is the third of the four canonical texts of Hinduism, the Vedas. By some, it is estimated to have been composed between 1,400 and 1000 BC, the Yajurveda 'Samhita', or 'compilation', contains the liturgy (mantras) needed to perform the sacrifices of the religion of the Vedic period, and the added Brahmana and Shrautasutra add information on the interpretation and on the details of their performance.

The Yajur Veda

Hindu canonical text with English translation.

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ISBN: UVA:X004321146

Category: Vedas

Page: 519

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Hindu canonical text with English translation.

The Yajurveda with glossary and index

The introduction and the index are added to help the reader. Everyone interested in the Vedas will find this book indispensable.

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Author: Devi Chand

Publisher: South Asia Books

ISBN: 8121502942

Category: Hindu literature, Sanskrit

Page: 452

View: 626

Description: The Vedas are the foundation on which the imposing Hindu religious edifice is built. The Yajurveda contains hymns taken from the older Rigveda and prose passages which are new. The hymns display considerable deviation from the original Rigvedic text. It can be called a priestly manual; for it lays down rules for the performance of various sacrifices. It has two samhitas or a collection of hymns of mantras; these are Taittiriya Samhita and Vajasaneya Samhita, popularly known as Black and White Yajur respectively. The subject-matter of both the samhitas is almost the same, though the arrangement is somewhat different. Of the two the Vajasaneya Samhita is planned in a more systematic and orderly manner than the other. It also contains some texts which are not found in the Taittiriya Samhita. This translation of Yajurveda by Devi Chand is based upon Swami Dayanand's interpretation. The translator has provided references in the footnotes to the different views of other scholars. To bring home to the common man the message of the Yajurveda, he has spared no pains to remove all obscurities inherent in the old form of Sanskrit which was in vogue three thousand years ago. The introduction and the index are added to help the reader. Everyone interested in the Vedas will find this book indispensable.

The Vedas

The present volume is an unabridged compilation of all four Vedas (Rig, White and Black Yajur, Sama and Atharva). Four of the translations are from Ralph Griffith, with the remaining (black yajur) from Arthur Keith.

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Author: Jon William Fergus

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1541294718

Category: Hindu hymns, Sanskrit

Page: 498

View: 389

The present volume is an unabridged compilation of all four Vedas (Rig, White and Black Yajur, Sama and Atharva). Four of the translations are from Ralph Griffith, with the remaining (black yajur) from Arthur Keith. The texts have been proofed and all Sanskrit terms updated and synced between versions. An Index-Dictionary of Sanskrit terms has been published as a second volume: ISBN: 978-1541304079. From the foreword: The Vedas (from the root vid, "to know," or "divine knowledge") are the most ancient of all the Hindu scriptures. There were originally three Vedas-the Laws of Manu always speaks of the three, as do the oldest (Mukhya) Upanishads-but a later work called the Atharvaveda has been added to these, to now constitute the fourth. The name Rigveda signifies "Veda of verses," from rig, a spoken stanza; Samaveda, the "Veda of chants," from saman, a song or chant; Yajurveda, the "Veda of sacrificial formulas," from yajus, a sacrificial text. The Atharvaveda derives its name from the sage Atharvan, who is represented as a Prajapati, the edlest son of Brahma, and who is said to have been the first to institute the fire-sacrifices. The complex nature of the Vedas and the array of texts associated with them may be briefly outlined as follows: "The Rig-Veda is the original work, the Yajur-Veda and Sama-Veda in their mantric portions are different arrangements of its hymns for special purposes. The Vedas are divided into two parts, the Mantra and Brahmana. The Mantra part is composed of suktas (hymns in verse); the Brahmana part consists of liturgical, ritualistic, exegetical, and mystic treatises in prose. The Mantra or verse portion is considered more ancient than the prose works; and the books in which the hymns are collected are called samhitas (collections). More or less closely connected with the Brahmanans (and in a few exceptional cases with the Mantra part) are two classes of treatises in prose and verse called Aranyaka and Upanishad. The Vedic writings are again divided into two great divisions, exoteric and esoteric, the former called the karma-kanda (the section of works) and the latter the jnana-kanda (section of wisdom)." (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) The great antiquity of the Vedas is sufficiently proven by the fact that they are written in such an ancient form of Sanskrit, so different from the Sanskrit now used, that there is no other work like them in the literature of this "eldest sister" of all the known languages, as Prof. Max Muller calls it. Only the most learned of the Brahman Pundits can read the Vedas in their original. Furthermore, the Vedas cannot be viewed as singular works by singular authors, but rather as compilations, assembled over a great and unknown period of time. "Almost every hymn or division of a Veda is ascribed to various authors. It is generally believed that these subdivisions were revealed orally to the rishis or sages whose respective names they bear; hence the body of the Veda is known as sruti (what was heard) or divine revelation. The very names of these Vedic sages, such as Vasishtha, Visvamitra, and Narada, all of which belong to men born in far distant ages, shows that millennia must have elapsed between the different dates of their composition." (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) It is generally agreed that the Vedas were finally arranged and compiled around fourteen centuries before our era; but this interferes in no way with their great antiquity, as they are acknowledged to have been long taught and passed down orally, perhaps for thousands of years, perhaps for far longer, before being finally compiled and recorded (the latter is traditionally said to have occurred on the shores of Lake Manasarovara, beyond the Himalayas).

The Black Yajurveda

The present volume is an unabridged edition of the Black Yajurveda, part of a five volume set of the complete Veda Samhitas.

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Author: Anonymous

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1542462525

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Page: 302

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The present volume is an unabridged edition of the Black Yajurveda, part of a five volume set of the complete Veda Samhitas. Each Veda has been proofed and all Sanskrit terms updated and synced between versions. An index is provided at the close of each volume for all Sanskrit terms that were left untranslated. -- Volumes available in this set: 1. Rigveda 978-1542459075; 2. White Yajurveda 978-1542459105; 3. Black Yajurveda 978-1542462525; 4. Samaveda 978-1542463379; 5. Atharvaveda 978-1542464222. -- A single volume edition of all Vedas is also available: 978-1541294714 - - From the foreword: The Vedas (from the root vid, "to know," or "divine knowledge") are the most ancient of all the Hindu scriptures. There were originally three Vedas-the Laws of Manu always speaks of the three, as do the oldest (Mukhya) Upanishads-but a later work called the Atharvaveda has been added to these, to now constitute the fourth. The name Rigveda signifies "Veda of verses," from rig, a spoken stanza; Samaveda, the "Veda of chants," from saman, a song or chant; Yajurveda, the "Veda of sacrificial formulas," from yajus, a sacrificial text. The Atharvaveda derives its name from the sage Atharvan, who is represented as a Prajapati, the edlest son of Brahma, and who is said to have been the first to institute the fire-sacrifices. The complex nature of the Vedas and the array of texts associated with them may be briefly outlined as follows: "The Rig-Veda is the original work, the Yajur-Veda and Sama-Veda in their mantric portions are different arrangements of its hymns for special purposes. The Vedas are divided into two parts, the Mantra and Brahmana. The Mantra part is composed of suktas (hymns in verse); the Brahmana part consists of liturgical, ritualistic, exegetical, and mystic treatises in prose. The Mantra or verse portion is considered more ancient than the prose works; and the books in which the hymns are collected are called samhitas (collections). More or less closely connected with the Brahmanans (and in a few exceptional cases with the Mantra part) are two classes of treatises in prose and verse called Aranyaka and Upanishad. The Vedic writings are again divided into two great divisions, exoteric and esoteric, the former called the karma-kanda (the section of works) and the latter the jnana-kanda (section of wisdom)." (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) The great antiquity of the Vedas is sufficiently proven by the fact that they are written in such an ancient form of Sanskrit, so different from the Sanskrit now used, that there is no other work like them in the literature of this "eldest sister" of all the known languages, as Prof. Max Muller calls it. Only the most learned of the Brahman Pundits can read the Vedas in their original. Furthermore, the Vedas cannot be viewed as singular works by singular authors, but rather as compilations, assembled over a great and unknown period of time. "Almost every hymn or division of a Veda is ascribed to various authors. It is generally believed that these subdivisions were revealed orally to the rishis or sages whose respective names they bear; hence the body of the Veda is known as sruti (what was heard) or divine revelation. The very names of these Vedic sages, such as Vasishtha, Visvamitra, and Narada, all of which belong to men born in far distant ages, shows that millennia must have elapsed between the different dates of their composition." (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) It is generally agreed that the Vedas were finally arranged and compiled around fourteen centuries before our era; but this interferes in no way with their great antiquity, as they are acknowledged to have been long taught and passed down orally, perhaps for thousands of years, perhaps for far longer, before being finally compiled and recorded (the latter is traditionally said to have occurred on the shores of Lake Manasarovara, beyond the Himalayas).

Yajurveda

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Author: Dr. Rajbahadur Pandey

Publisher: Diamond Pocket Books (P) Ltd.

ISBN: 8171826679

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Page: 140

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The Yajur Veda Taittiriya Sanhita

The Yajur Veda (Taittiriya Sanhita) Arthur Berriedale Keith Prapathaka 6. The now and full moon sacrifices 1. The foresacrifices 2. The portionsofbutter 3.

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Author: Arthur Berriedale Keith

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 9781465578396

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Page:

View: 744

The Yajurveda

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Author: Devi Chand

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:59114383

Category: Vedas

Page: 452

View: 831

Isavasya Upanishad

The Isa, also the Isavasya Upanishad be, It from the Yajur Veda (Vajasaneyi) truly; It teaches of God, world essential unity, And of being and becoming very clearly; It not so interested in Absolute in self be, As in the Absolute in ...

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Author: Munindra Misra

Publisher: Osmora Incorporated

ISBN: 9782765930389

Category: Religion

Page: 21

View: 694

The Isa, also the Isavasya Upanishad be, It from the Yajur Veda (Vajasaneyi) truly; It teaches of God, world essential unity, And of being and becoming very clearly; It not so interested in Absolute in self be, As in the Absolute in relation to world be; It teaches that the life in this world but be, Not incompatible to life in Divine Spirit truly; Who beholds all beings in Self, Self in all be, Never turns away from the Self - its part be.

The Hindu Students Yajur Veda

WWW.HSAINTERNATIONAL.ORG The Yajurveda is the 2nd of the four Vedas.

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Author: Hindu Students Association International

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1522940146

Category:

Page: 632

View: 186

WWW.HSAINTERNATIONAL.ORG The Yajurveda is the 2nd of the four Vedas. The word combines yajus "sacrificial formula" and veda "knowledge" in Sanskrit, or "sacrificial knowledge". Estimated to have been mostly composed c. 5000-4500 BCE it contains the mantras needed to perform the sacrifices spoken of throughout the Vedas.

The White Yajurveda

The present volume is an unabridged edition of the White Yajurveda, part of a five volume set of the complete Veda Samhitas.

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Author: Anonymous

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1542459109

Category:

Page: 114

View: 313

The present volume is an unabridged edition of the White Yajurveda, part of a five volume set of the complete Veda Samhitas. Each Veda has been proofed and all Sanskrit terms updated and synced between versions. An index is provided at the close of each volume for all Sanskrit terms that were left untranslated. -- Volumes available in this set: 1. Rigveda 978-1542459075; 2. White Yajurveda 978-1542459105; 3. Black Yajurveda 978-1542462525; 4. Samaveda 978-1542463379; 5. Atharvaveda 978-1542464222. -- A single volume edition of all Vedas is also available: 978-1541294714 - - From the foreword: The Vedas (from the root vid, "to know," or "divine knowledge") are the most ancient of all the Hindu scriptures. There were originally three Vedas-the Laws of Manu always speaks of the three, as do the oldest (Mukhya) Upanishads-but a later work called the Atharvaveda has been added to these, to now constitute the fourth. The name Rigveda signifies "Veda of verses," from rig, a spoken stanza; Samaveda, the "Veda of chants," from saman, a song or chant; Yajurveda, the "Veda of sacrificial formulas," from yajus, a sacrificial text. The Atharvaveda derives its name from the sage Atharvan, who is represented as a Prajapati, the edlest son of Brahma, and who is said to have been the first to institute the fire-sacrifices. The complex nature of the Vedas and the array of texts associated with them may be briefly outlined as follows: "The Rig-Veda is the original work, the Yajur-Veda and Sama-Veda in their mantric portions are different arrangements of its hymns for special purposes. The Vedas are divided into two parts, the Mantra and Brahmana. The Mantra part is composed of suktas (hymns in verse); the Brahmana part consists of liturgical, ritualistic, exegetical, and mystic treatises in prose. The Mantra or verse portion is considered more ancient than the prose works; and the books in which the hymns are collected are called samhitas (collections). More or less closely connected with the Brahmanans (and in a few exceptional cases with the Mantra part) are two classes of treatises in prose and verse called Aranyaka and Upanishad. The Vedic writings are again divided into two great divisions, exoteric and esoteric, the former called the karma-kanda (the section of works) and the latter the jnana-kanda (section of wisdom)." (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) The great antiquity of the Vedas is sufficiently proven by the fact that they are written in such an ancient form of Sanskrit, so different from the Sanskrit now used, that there is no other work like them in the literature of this "eldest sister" of all the known languages, as Prof. Max Muller calls it. Only the most learned of the Brahman Pundits can read the Vedas in their original. Furthermore, the Vedas cannot be viewed as singular works by singular authors, but rather as compilations, assembled over a great and unknown period of time. "Almost every hymn or division of a Veda is ascribed to various authors. It is generally believed that these subdivisions were revealed orally to the rishis or sages whose respective names they bear; hence the body of the Veda is known as sruti (what was heard) or divine revelation. The very names of these Vedic sages, such as Vasishtha, Visvamitra, and Narada, all of which belong to men born in far distant ages, shows that millennia must have elapsed between the different dates of their composition." (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) It is generally agreed that the Vedas were finally arranged and compiled around fourteen centuries before our era; but this interferes in no way with their great antiquity, as they are acknowledged to have been long taught and passed down orally, perhaps for thousands of years, perhaps for far longer, before being finally compiled and recorded (the latter is traditionally said to have occurred on the shores of Lake Manasarovara, beyond the Himalayas).

The Vedas

The texts have been proofed and all Sanskrit terms updated and synced between versions. From the foreword to the main volume: The Vedas (from the root vid, "to know," or "divine knowledge") are the most ancient of all the Hindu scriptures.

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Author: Jon Fergus

Publisher:

ISBN: 1541304071

Category:

Page: 202

View: 141

The present Index of Sanskrit Terms applies to the single-volume unabridged edition (978-1541294714) of the Vedas (Rig, White and Black Yajur, Sama and Atharva). Dictionary definitions are drawn from "A Sanskrit-English Dictionary" by M. Monier-Williams (1899). Four of the translations in the main volume are from Ralph Griffith, with the remaining (black yajur) from Arthur Keith. The texts have been proofed and all Sanskrit terms updated and synced between versions.From the foreword to the main volume: The Vedas (from the root vid, "to know," or "divine knowledge") are the most ancient of all the Hindu scriptures. There were originally three Vedas-the Laws of Manu always speaks of the three, as do the oldest (Mukhya) Upanishads-but a later work called the Atharvaveda has been added to these, to now constitute the fourth. The name Rigveda signifies "Veda of verses," from rig, a spoken stanza; Samaveda, the "Veda of chants," from saman, a song or chant; Yajurveda, the "Veda of sacrificial formulas," from yajus, a sacrificial text. The Atharvaveda derives its name from the sage Atharvan, who is represented as a Prajapati, the edlest son of Brahma, and who is said to have been the first to institute the fire-sacrifices. The complex nature of the Vedas and the array of texts associated with them may be briefly outlined as follows: "The Rig-Veda is the original work, the Yajur-Veda and Sama-Veda in their mantric portions are different arrangements of its hymns for special purposes. The Vedas are divided into two parts, the Mantra and Brahmana. The Mantra part is composed of suktas (hymns in verse); the Brahmana part consists of liturgical, ritualistic, exegetical, and mystic treatises in prose. The Mantra or verse portion is considered more ancient than the prose works; and the books in which the hymns are collected are called samhitas (collections). More or less closely connected with the Brahmanans (and in a few exceptional cases with the Mantra part) are two classes of treatises in prose and verse called Aranyaka and Upanishad. The Vedic writings are again divided into two great divisions, exoteric and esoteric, the former called the karma-kanda (the section of works) and the latter the jnana-kanda (section of wisdom)." (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) The great antiquity of the Vedas is sufficiently proven by the fact that they are written in such an ancient form of Sanskrit, so different from the Sanskrit now used, that there is no other work like them in the literature of this "eldest sister" of all the known languages, as Prof. Max Muller calls it. Only the most learned of the Brahman Pundits can read the Vedas in their original. Furthermore, the Vedas cannot be viewed as singular works by singular authors, but rather as compilations, assembled over a great and unknown period of time. "Almost every hymn or division of a Veda is ascribed to various authors. It is generally believed that these subdivisions were revealed orally to the rishis or sages whose respective names they bear; hence the body of the Veda is known as sruti (what was heard) or divine revelation. The very names of these Vedic sages, such as Vasishtha, Visvamitra, and Narada, all of which belong to men born in far distant ages, shows that millennia must have elapsed between the different dates of their composition." (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) It is generally agreed that the Vedas were finally arranged and compiled around fourteen centuries before our era; but this interferes in no way with their great antiquity, as they are acknowledged to have been long taught and passed down orally, perhaps for thousands of years, perhaps for far longer, before being finally compiled and recorded (the latter is traditionally said to have occurred on the shores of Lake Manasarovara, beyond the Himalayas).

Yajur Veda

The Yajurveda is the 2nd of the four Vedas.

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Author: Elemental Hinduism

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ISBN: 1544764987

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Page: 632

View: 525

The Yajurveda is the 2nd of the four Vedas. The word combines yajus "sacrificial formula" and veda "knowledge" in Sanskrit, or "sacrificial knowledge". Estimated to have been mostly composed c. 5000-4500 BCE it contains the mantras needed to perform the sacrifices spoken of throughout the Vedas.

The Yajur Veda

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Author: Bibek Debroy

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:32197136

Category: Hindu philosophy

Page: 105

View: 372

Yajurveda

The Yajurveda is popular as the second Veda. It is believed that the hymns of the Yajurveda have been created from the hymns of the Rigveda because 663 ...

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Author: Dr. Rekha Vyas

Publisher: Vishv Books Private Limited

ISBN: 9789350653470

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 977

YAJURVEDA The YAJURVEDA in Sanskrit means 'wisdom of sacrificial formulas'. The YAJURVEDA is the book of rituals which was compiled in ancient times to perform the Yagya and other rituals in right order. The YAJURVEDA is popular as the second Veda. It is claimed that the hymns of YAJURVEDA have been created from the hymns of the Rigveda as 663 hymns are copied from it. The YAJURVEDA not only depicts the situation prevailing during yagya period along with spread of knowledge, god, and social importance. This translation is based on the grammar of famous Vedic interpreter Acharya Uvat. The entire text, the names of the gods and rituals whose equivalent could not be found in English have been given as proper nouns. This Veda is a precise and accurate in the translation from its Hindi version translated by renowned Sanskrit grammar expert.

Message Of The Vedas

The Yajur - Veda Just opposed to the Rig - Veda Samhita which is entirely in poetry , major portions of the Yajur - Veda are in prose form .

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Author: B.B. Paliwal

Publisher: Diamond Pocket Books (P) Ltd.

ISBN: 8128811797

Category: Vedas

Page: 240

View: 932