Tolstoy on Shakespeare A Critical Essay on Shakespeare

In their scope, breadth and realistic depiction of 19th-century Russian life, the two books stand at the peak of realist fiction.

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Author: Leo Tolstoy

Publisher: Aegitas

ISBN: 9780369405753

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 90

View: 291

Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy and (1828-1910 and ) commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer - novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher - as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. He was the most influential member of the aristocratic Tolstoy family. His first publications were three autobiographical novels, Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth and (1852-1856 and ). They tell of a rich landowner and 's son and his slow realization of the differences between him and his peasants. As a fiction writer Tolstoy is widely regarded as one of the greatest of all novelists, particularly noted for his masterpieces War and Peace and (1869 and ) and Anna Karenina and (1877 and ). In their scope, breadth and realistic depiction of 19th-century Russian life, the two books stand at the peak of realist fiction. As a moral philosopher Tolstoy was notable for his ideas on nonviolent resistance through works such as The Kingdom of God is Within You and (1894 and ). During his life, Tolstoy came to the conclusion that William Shakespeare is a bad dramatist and not a true artist at all. Tolstoy explained his views in a critical essay on Shakespeare written in 1903.

Tolstoy on Shakespeare A Critical Essay on Shakespeare

Mr. Crosby's article on Shakespeare's attitude toward the working classes suggested to me the idea of also expressing my own long-established opinion about the works of Shakespeare, in direct opposition, as it is, to that established in all ...

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Author: Graf Leo Tolstoy

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 9781465510600

Category:

Page: 169

View: 205

Mr. Crosby's article on Shakespeare's attitude toward the working classes suggested to me the idea of also expressing my own long-established opinion about the works of Shakespeare, in direct opposition, as it is, to that established in all the whole European world. Calling to mind all the struggle of doubt and self-deceit,—efforts to attune myself to Shakespeare—which I went through owing to my complete disagreement with this universal adulation, and, presuming that many have experienced and are experiencing the same, I think that it may not be unprofitable to express definitely and frankly this view of mine, opposed to that of the majority, and the more so as the conclusions to which I came, when examining the causes of my disagreement with the universally established opinion, are, it seems to me, not without interest and significance. My disagreement with the established opinion about Shakespeare is not the result of an accidental frame of mind, nor of a light-minded attitude toward the matter, but is the outcome of many years' repeated and insistent endeavors to harmonize my own views of Shakespeare with those established amongst all civilized men of the Christian world. I remember the astonishment I felt when I first read Shakespeare. I expected to receive a powerful esthetic pleasure, but having read, one after the other, works regarded as his best: "King Lear," "Romeo and Juliet," "Hamlet" and "Macbeth," not only did I feel no delight, but I felt an irresistible repulsion and tedium, and doubted as to whether I was senseless in feeling works regarded as the summit of perfection by the whole of the civilized world to be trivial and positively bad, or whether the significance which this civilized world attributes to the works of Shakespeare was itself senseless. My consternation was increased by the fact that I always keenly felt the beauties of poetry in every form; then why should artistic works recognized by the whole world as those of a genius,—the works of Shakespeare,—not only fail to please me, but be disagreeable to me? For a long time I could not believe in myself, and during fifty years, in order to test myself, I several times recommenced reading Shakespeare in every possible form, in Russian, in English, in German and in Schlegel's translation, as I was advised. Several times I read the dramas and the comedies and historical plays, and I invariably underwent the same feelings: repulsion, weariness, and bewilderment.

Tolstoy or Dostoevsky

To the end, theHomeric poems stood between Tolstoy and total iconoclasm. In particular, he sought to distinguish between a false portrayal of reality which he associated with Shakespeare and a true rendering exemplified in the Iliad and ...

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Author: George Steiner

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 9780571266494

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 879

George Steiner's Tolstoy or Dostoevsky has become a classic among scholars of Russian literature. An essay in poetic and philosophic criticism that bears mainly on the Russian masters, Tolstoy or Dostoevsky deals also with larger themes: the epic tradition extending from Homer to Tolstoy; the continuity of a "tragic world view" from Oedipus Rex to King Lear and The Brothers Karamazov; the contrasts between the epic and dramatic modes, between irreconcilably opposed views of God and of history.

Shakespeare and Space

Nor did he concur with the most authoritative of Shakespeare's critics Lev Tolstoy, of whose attitude he must have been aware from conversations. Tolstoy first published his views on the subject in his book What is Art (Chto takoe ...

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Author: Ina Habermann

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137518354

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 282

View: 233

This collection offers an overview of the ways in which space has become relevant to the study of Shakespearean drama and theatre. It distinguishes various facets of space, such as structural aspects of dramatic composition, performance space and the evocation of place, linguistic, social and gendered spaces, early modern geographies, and the impact of theatrical mobility on cultural exchange and the material world. These facets of space are exemplified in individual essays. Throughout, the Shakespearean stage is conceived as a topological ‘node’, or interface between different times, places and people – an approach which also invokes Edward Soja’s notion of ‘Thirdspace’ to describe the blend between the real and the imaginary characteristic of Shakespeare’s multifaceted theatrical world. Part Two of the volume emphasises the theatrical mobility of Hamlet – conceptually from an anthropological perspective, and historically in the tragedy’s migrations to Germany, Russia and North America.

Tolstoy on Shakespeare

Leo Tolstoy had a profound influence on people through out the Western world. Leo Tolstoy was a Russian novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher. Tolstoy was a member of the aristocratic Tolstoy family.

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Author: Leo Nikolayevich Tolstoy

Publisher: Book Jungle

ISBN: 1438535740

Category: Fiction

Page: 122

View: 283

Leo Tolstoy had a profound influence on people through out the Western world. Leo Tolstoy was a Russian novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher. Tolstoy was a member of the aristocratic Tolstoy family. He was known as an educational reformer, pacifist and Christian anarchist. His masterpiece War and Peace made him one of the world's greatest novelists. His ability to depict life in 19th century Russia made him a leader in realist fiction. Tolstoy's stand on nonviolent resistance influenced twentieth century people such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Ghandi. As a moral philosopher Tolstoy was notable for his ideas on nonviolent resistance through works such as The Kingdom of God is Within You (1894). William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616) is the most influential writer in English history. Shakespeare has been called The Barb of Avon and England's national poet. There are 2 narrative poems, 154 sonnets and 38 plays in his collected works. He began work as an actor and writer in London first writing comedies and historic plays. He later wrote tragedies. Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth and Othello are some of his more famous plays.

Study Guide to Othello by William Shakespeare

Tolstoy, Leo, Tolstoy on Shakespeare, New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1906. An extremely hostile, provocative and wrongheaded personal interpretation by the great novelist. It should be read in connection with George Orwell.

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Author: Intelligent Education

Publisher: Influence Publishers

ISBN: 9781645425779

Category: Study Aids

Page: 204

View: 230

A comprehensive study guide offering in-depth explanation, essay, and test prep for William Shakespeare’s Othello, the inspiration behind many operas, films, and literary adaptations. As a tragedy of the seventeenth-century, Othello’s performance continues today due to the timeless themes of racism, love, jealousy, betrayal, revenge and repentance. Moreover, Shakespeare was inspired by English, French, and Italian works, but Othello was primarily inspired by Giovanni Battista Giraldi Cinthio’s Hecatommithi. This Bright Notes Study Guide explores the context and history of Shakespeare’s classic work, helping students to thoroughly explore the reasons it has stood the literary test of time. Each Bright Notes Study Guide contains: - Introductions to the Author and the Work - Character Summaries - Plot Guides - Section and Chapter Overviews - Test Essay and Study Q&As The Bright Notes Study Guide series offers an in-depth tour of more than 275 classic works of literature, exploring characters, critical commentary, historical background, plots, and themes. This set of study guides encourages readers to dig deeper in their understanding by including essay questions and answers as well as topics for further research.

Shakespeare Routledge Revivals

On his personality: BRADLEY, A. C: “Shakespeare the Man,” in Oxford Lectures on Poetry, London, 1909. ... On Shakespeare's political and social attitude, see, for the view that he was anti-democratic, TOLSTOY: On Shakespeare and the ...

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Author: Raymond Macdonald Alden

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317950844

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 398

View: 286

This fascinating title, first published in 1922, presents a detailed overview of the life and works of Shakespeare. Alden first considers Shakespeare’s Elizabethan context, alongside exploring the Classical and Italian foundations, political theories, concepts and theatrical trends that influenced his works. Next, a comprehensive biography provides insight into Shakespeare’s probable education, relationships and contemporaries. The final sections are devoted to the genres into which Shakespeare’s works have been categorised, with full analyses of and backgrounds to the poems, histories, comedies and tragedies. An important study, this title will be of particular value to students in need of a comprehensive overview of Shakespeare’s life and works, as well as the more general inquisitive reader.

Shakespeare s Apprenticeship

Tolman, Albert H. “Shakespeare's Part in the 'Taming of the Shrew.'” PMLA. v. 5, no. 4 (1890) pp. 201–278. Tolstoy, Leo. Tolstoy on Shakespeare. V.G. Tchertkoff, ed. and tr. Christchurch, Hants: Free Age Press, 1907. Tottel, Richard.

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Author: Ramon Jiménez

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476633312

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 348

View: 656

The contents of the Shakespeare canon have come into question in recent years as scholars add plays or declare others only partially his work. Now, new literary and historical evidence demonstrates that five heretofore anonymous plays published or performed during his lifetime are actually his first versions of later canonical works. Three histories, The Famous Victories of Henry the Fifth, The True Tragedy of Richard the Third, and The Troublesome Reign of John; a comedy, The Taming of a Shrew; and a romance, King Leir, are products of Shakespeare's juvenile years. Later in his career, he transformed them into the plays that bear nearly identical titles. Each is strikingly similar to its canonical counterpart in terms of structure, plot and cast, though the texts were entirely rewritten. Virtually all scholars, critics and editors of Shakespeare have overlooked or disputed the idea that he had anything to do with them. This addition of five plays to the Shakespeare canon introduces a new facet to the authorship debate, and supplies further evidence that the real Shakespeare was Edward de Vere, seventeenth Earl of Oxford.

Tolstoy on Shakespeare the Original Classic Edition

This is a new and freshly published edition of this culturally important work by Leo Tolstoy, which is now, at last, again available to you. Enjoy this classic work today.

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Author: Leo Tolstoy

Publisher: Tebbo

ISBN: 148615347X

Category: Fiction

Page: 50

View: 722

Finally available, a high quality book of the original classic edition of Tolstoy on Shakespeare. This is a new and freshly published edition of this culturally important work by Leo Tolstoy, which is now, at last, again available to you. Enjoy this classic work today. These selected paragraphs distill the contents and give you a quick look inside Tolstoy on Shakespeare: Not to mention the pompous, characterless language of King Lear, the same in which all Shakespeares Kings speak, the reader, or spectator, can not conceive that a King, however old and stupid he may be, could believe the words of the vicious daughters, with whom he had passed his whole life, and not believe his favorite daughter, but curse and banish her; and therefore the spectator, or reader, can not share the feelings of the persons participating in this unnatural scene. ...Lear becomes yet more exasperated and again curses Goneril, but when he is told that it was the Duke himself who ordered the stocks, he does not say anything, because, at this moment, Regan tells him that she can not receive him now and that he had best return to Goneril, and that in a months time she herself will receive him, with, however, not a hundred but fifty servants. ...Lears vacillations between pride, anger, and the hope of his daughters giving in, would be exceedingly touching if it were not spoilt by the verbose absurdities to which he gives vent, about being[24] ready to divorce himself from Regans dead mother, should Regan not be glad to receive him, -or about his calling down fen suckd frogs which he invokes, upon the head of his daughter, or about the heavens being obliged to patronize old people because they themselves are old. ...Then the King, after his disconnected utterances, suddenly begins to speak ironically about flatterers, who agreed to all he said, Ay, and no, too, was no good divinity, but, when he got into a storm without shelter, he saw all this was not true; and then goes on to[37] say that as all creation addicts itself to adultery, and Gloucesters bastard son had treated his father more kindly than his daughters had treated him (altho Lear, according to the development of the drama, could not know how Edmund had treated Gloucester), therefore, let dissoluteness prosper, the more so as, being a King, he needs soldiers. ...Then, when, according to the old drama, Leir asks his daughters about their love for him, Cordelia does not say, as Shakespeare has it, that she will not give her father all her love, but will love her husband, too, should she marry-which is quite unnatural-but simply says that she can not express her love in words, but hopes that her actions will prove it.

A critical Essay on Shakespeare By LEO TOLSTOY

I expected to receive a powerful aesthetic pleasure, but having read, one after the other, works regarded as his best: "King Lear," "Romeo and Juliet," "Hamlet" and "Macbeth," not only did I feel no delight, but I felt an irresistible ...

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Author: Leo Tolstoy

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783748157304

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 130

View: 654

I remember the astonishment I felt when I first read Shakespeare. I expected to receive a powerful aesthetic pleasure, but having read, one after the other, works regarded as his best: "King Lear," "Romeo and Juliet," "Hamlet" and "Macbeth," not only did I feel no delight, but I felt an irresistible repulsion and tedium, and doubted as to whether I was senseless in feeling works regarded as the summit of perfection by the whole of the civilized world to be trivial and positively bad, or whether the significance which this civilized world attributes to the works of Shakespeare was itself senseless. My consternation was increased by the fact that I always keenly felt the beauties of poetry in every form; then why should artistic works recognized by the whole world as those of a genius,-the works of Shakespeare,-not only fail to please me, but be disagreeable to me? For a long time I could not believe in myself, and during fifty years, in order to test myself, I several times recommenced reading Shakespeare in every possible form, in Russian, in English, in German and in Schlegel's translation, as I was advised. Several times I read the dramas and the comedies and historical plays, and I invariably underwent the same feelings: repulsion, weariness, and bewilderment. At the present time, before writing this preface, being desirous once more to test myself, I have, as an old man of seventy-five, again read the whole of Shakespeare, including the historical plays, the "Henrys," "Troilus and Cressida," the "Tempest," "Cymbeline," and I have felt, with even greater force, the same feelings,-this time, however, not of bewilderment, but of firm, indubitable conviction that the unquestionable glory of a great genius which Shakespeare enjoys, and which compels writers of our time to imitate him and readers and spectators to discover in him non-existent merits,-thereby distorting their aesthetic and ethical understanding,-is a great evil, as is every untruth.