Yavapai County

Yavapai finally settled to 8,125 square miles. While still a US territory in 1900, Yavapai County had a population just under 13,800 people and was quite remote.

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Author: Rick Sprain

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467124508

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 903

In 1864, Arizona was divided into four counties named after the local Indian communities: Yavapai, Yuma, Mohave, and Pima. Believed to have been the largest county ever created in the lower 48 states at the time, Yavapai encompassed over 65,000 square miles until 1891, when the state was divided into additional counties. Yavapai finally settled to 8,125 square miles. While still a US territory in 1900, Yavapai County had a population just under 13,800 people and was quite remote. Within a few years, postcards started appearing in drugstores, such as Brisley, Timerhoff, Owl, Heit, Corbin and Bork, or Eagle Drug in Prescott and Lynn Boyd or Mitchell in Jerome. Many of the original postcards showcase early mines, towns, and buildings that no longer exist today.

Around Yavapai County

On February 23, 1863, Pres. Abraham Lincoln signed the bill creating the Territory of Arizona. The first Arizona Territorial Legislature established the capital at Prescott and met in September 1864.

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Author: Nancy Burgess

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738579629

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 563

On February 23, 1863, Pres. Abraham Lincoln signed the bill creating the Territory of Arizona. The first Arizona Territorial Legislature established the capital at Prescott and met in September 1864. They divided the territory into four counties: Mohave, Pima, Yavapai, and Yuma. Yavapai County, the "mother county," consisted of approximately 65,000 square miles and was believed to be the largest county in the United States. By the time Arizona attained statehood on February 14, 1912, there were 14 counties, and Yavapai County had been reduced in size to 8,125 square miles. Yavapai County has a rich history in mining, ranching, farming, military, and business. Today, Yavapai County is a thriving, growing county with nine incorporated cities and towns and numerous unincorporated communities, such as Ash Fork, Black Canyon City, Cornville, Mayer, and Skull Valley. Historic sites include Sharlot Hall Museum in Prescott, the town of Jerome, Fort Verde, Montezuma's Castle and Well, and Tuzigoot.

Around Yavapai County Celebrating Arizona s Centennial

On February 23, 1863, Pres. Abraham Lincoln signed the bill creating the Territory of Arizona. The first Arizona Territorial Legislature established the capital at Prescott and met in September 1864.

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Author: Nancy Burgess

Publisher: Arcadia Library Editions

ISBN: 1531652557

Category: History

Page: 130

View: 281

On February 23, 1863, Pres. Abraham Lincoln signed the bill creating the Territory of Arizona. The first Arizona Territorial Legislature established the capital at Prescott and met in September 1864. They divided the territory into four counties: Mohave, Pima, Yavapai, and Yuma. Yavapai County, the "mother county," consisted of approximately 65,000 square miles and was believed to be the largest county in the United States. By the time Arizona attained statehood on February 14, 1912, there were 14 counties, and Yavapai County had been reduced in size to 8,125 square miles. Yavapai County has a rich history in mining, ranching, farming, military, and business. Today, Yavapai County is a thriving, growing county with nine incorporated cities and towns and numerous unincorporated communities, such as Ash Fork, Black Canyon City, Cornville, Mayer, and Skull Valley. Historic sites include Sharlot Hall Museum in Prescott, the town of Jerome, Fort Verde, Montezuma's Castle and Well, and Tuzigoot.

Around Yavapai County

Celebrating Arizona's Centennial Nancy Burgess, Karen Despain, Yavapai County Arizona Centennial Committee. The residents of Arizona Territory lobbied ...

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Author: Nancy Burgess

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439649800

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 690

On February 23, 1863, Pres. Abraham Lincoln signed the bill creating the Territory of Arizona. The first Arizona Territorial Legislature established the capital at Prescott and met in September 1864. They divided the territory into four counties: Mohave, Pima, Yavapai, and Yuma. Yavapai County, the “mother county,” consisted of approximately 65,000 square miles and was believed to be the largest county in the United States. By the time Arizona attained statehood on February 14, 1912, there were 14 counties, and Yavapai County had been reduced in size to 8,125 square miles. Yavapai County has a rich history in mining, ranching, farming, military, and business. Today, Yavapai County is a thriving, growing county with nine incorporated cities and towns and numerous unincorporated communities, such as Ash Fork, Black Canyon City, Cornville, Mayer, and Skull Valley. Historic sites include Sharlot Hall Museum in Prescott, the town of Jerome, Fort Verde, Montezuma’s Castle and Well, and Tuzigoot.

Cemeteries of Yavapai County

The first Territorial legislature divided Arizona up into four counties, with Yavapai County (named for the Indian tribe) being the largest, ...

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Author: Parker Anderson

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439644102

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 629

Yavapai County, Arizona, is regarded as the most historically significant area within the state. After Arizona was proclaimed an American territory by Pres. Abraham Lincoln in 1863, it was here that the first territorial government was established. Yavapai County history and culture is reflected in its simple but deeply reverent burial grounds where many of Arizonas early pioneers are buried. The county has many cemeteries, and this book focuses on the most historic of these, from Prescott to Southern Yavapai ghost towns, where people ranging from Big Nose Kate to Sharlot M. Hall are interred, and examines the Old Wests attitudes toward death and burial.

Soil Survey of Yavapai County Arizona Western Part

The degree of horizon the major soil series in Yavapai County , Western development determines the age , or maturity , of the Part .

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Author: United States. Soil Conservation Service

Publisher:

ISBN: UCR:31210008257063

Category: Soil surveys

Page: 121

View: 772

Zonia Copper Mine Yavapai County Ariz

... po- 210 LEVEL Sec MAY , 1943 960 4940 FIG . 3 - ZONIA MINE , PROJECT 1417 , YAVAPAI COUNTY , ARIZONA R.I. 4023 Vegetation , typical of the semi - arid.

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Author: Charles A. Kumke

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015078490870

Category: Boring

Page: 6

View: 844

SR 169 Yarber Wash to I 17 Yavapai County

The Yavapai County engineer modified the first 3.2 miles of the alignment to follow the old existing county road and pass through the community of Dewey .

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Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: NWU:35556030097661

Category:

Page:

View: 241

Rolling Hills Cemetery of Yavapai County Prescott Arizona

Rolling Hills Cemetery is located northeast of Prescott off Hwy 89 and Ralph Pryne Drive.

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Author: Rolling Hills Cemetery (Prescott, Arizona)

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:41797148

Category: Cemeteries

Page: 50

View: 193

Rolling Hills Cemetery is located northeast of Prescott off Hwy 89 and Ralph Pryne Drive.