Zombie Myths of Australian Military History

In this fascinating account, leading Australian military historians tackle 10 of the most enduring historical zombies, or national myths, that have staggered their way through the halls of military history for more than 200 years.

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Author: Craig Stockings

Publisher: UNSW Press

ISBN: 9781742230795

Category: History

Page: 275

View: 923

Controversial, opinionated and confronting, this book challenges a number of time-honoured and perceived 'truths' of Australian military history and attempts to correct the historical record.

Anzac s Dirty Dozen

He was the first Australian to fly a powered Australian-made aeroplane in Australia. The full story of John Duigan and his flying career has now been published for the first time.

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Author: Craig Stockings

Publisher: UNSW Press

ISBN: 9781742245782

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 987

The flying career of John Robertson Duigan spanned just a decade from 1908 to 1918. 100 years ago he built and successfully flew the first aeroplane made in Australia using only photographs, journal articles and an unreliable textbook as his guides. He was the first Australian to fly a powered Australian-made aeroplane in Australia. The full story of John Duigan and his flying career has now been published for the first time.

Letters from the Veldt

Letters from the Veldt sheds light on the activities of imperial military contingents – in which Australians served – during the Imperial march to Pretoria from May-September 1900, the successful conclusion of which marked the end of ...

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Author: Craig Stockings

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781922387066

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 981

The South African War – or Boer War – running from 11 October 1899 until 31 May 1902 –was the largest British military effort since the Napoleonic Wars. It was also the first time that large-scale, meaningful contributions were made to an active theatre of war by the self-governing colonies. This included formal contributions of around 20,000 troops from the Australian colonies which dwarfed all previous Australian military commitments. Just as the war was a watershed event for the development and professionalisation of the British Army from 1902-14, it was momentous for the self-governing colonies in Australia and elsewhere in social, political and most certainly in military terms. Letters from the Veldt sheds light on the activities of imperial military contingents – in which Australians served – during the Imperial march to Pretoria from May-September 1900, the successful conclusion of which marked the end of ‘conventional’ operations in South Africa and the beginning of the ‘guerrilla’ phase that would drag on until May 1902. A large proportion of colonial troops serving in South Africa at this point did so as part of the 1st Mounted Infantry Brigade. Despite their importance, the experiences of this brigade have not figured largely in existing any accounts of the Boer War. The brigade itself was composed of not only Australians, but Canadians, New Zealanders, and British regular and volunteer troops, and a scattering of ‘loyal’ South Africans. It was in many ways a microcosm of imperial military cooperation; an important part of the steady development of attitudes, expectations and shared experience which led to the formation in 1914 of a much larger expeditionary force. This account does not follow a standard pattern or format – there is no measured, steady traditional narrative. Rather, the experiences of the 1st Mounted Infantry Brigade, and the light they shed on many wider issues, are presented through letters written home by its British commander, Major General Edward Thomas Henry ‘Curly’ Hutton – himself a little-known yet key figure in the early history of the Australian military. Read within their context, the Boer War letters of Major General Edward Hutton offer a window not only into the course and conduct of the imperial advance to Pretoria, but also a lens through which to better understand a range of wider issues that framed his world – the world of Australian military history before the term Anzac was coined.

The Battle of Bardia

Very few Australians today have heard of the battle. This book attempts to bring Bardia back into the light.

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Author: Craig Stockings

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781921941191

Category: History

Page: 196

View: 860

On the morning of 3 January 1941, Australians of the 6th Division led an assault against the Italian colonial fortress village of Bardia in Libya, not far from the Egyptian-Libyan frontier. The ensuing battle was the second of the First Libyan Campaign, but the first battle of the Second World War planned and fought predominantly by Australians. The fortress fell to the attackers a little over two days after the attack began, in what could only be described as a remarkable victory. At a cost of 130 killed and 326 wounded, the 6th Division captured around 40,000 Italian prisoners and very large quantities of military stores and equipment. The victory was heralded at the time in Australia as one of the greatest military achievements of that nation's military history. Quite soon afterwards, however, overshadowed perhaps by Rommel's subsequent desert advances, the tragedy in Greece, and the war in the Pacific, Bardia slipped from the public mind. Very few Australians today have heard of the battle. This book attempts to bring Bardia back into the light.

Britannia s Shield

Through an in-depth biographical study of Lieutenant-General Sir Edward Hutton, this book investigates imperial land defence prior to 1914.

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Author: Craig Stockings

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107094826

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 302

Through an in-depth biographical study of Lieutenant-General Sir Edward Hutton, this book investigates imperial land defence prior to 1914.

ANZAC s Dirty Dozen

It is, quite purposefully, a challenging collection of essays that, in debunking some of our most resilient misconceptions, goes beyond the controversial Zombie Myths of Australian MilitaryHistory, published in 2010.

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Author: Craig A. J. Stockings

Publisher: UNSW Press

ISBN: 9781742241258

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 772

Australian military history is a landscape of legends, yet across the length and breadth of military heritage, accuracy and objectivity are often shunted aside so that tales and myths bent on commemoration, veneration, and the idealization of Australian virtues can thrive. In this book, a team of renowned historians resume the battle to expose a host of stubborn fantasies and fabrications that obscure the real story. Confronting and clear-eyed, it goes beyond the indulgent, politicized, and emotionally-charged rhetoric of Anzac—that sacrosanct idea in the national psyche—to find out exactly what it means to be Australian at war, and proud of it.

On Ops Lessons and Challenges for the Australian Army since East Timor

He was awarded the Order of Australia (AM) 'for service to the international community and education through the ... as author/editor include Bardia: Myth, Reality and the Heirs of Anzac, Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, ...

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Author: Tom Frame

Publisher: UNSW Press

ISBN: 9781742242453

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 842

No-one in the Australian government or Army could have predicted that in the 25 years following the end of the Cold War Army personnel would be deployed to Rwanda, Cambodia, Somalia, Bougainville, East Timor, Afghanistan, Iraq and the Solomon Islands. In a constructive critique of the modern Australian Army, ‘On Ops’ examines the massive transformation that has taken place since troops were deployed to East Timor 1999. After decades of inactivity and the ‘long peace’ of the 1970s and 1980s the Army was stretched to the limit. Contributors include John Howard and Peter Leahy as well as Craig Stockings, David Horner and an impressive array of military historians, academics, intelligence experts and ex and current Army.

Anzac Memories

Official History of Australia in the War of 1914–18, Vol xi, Australia During the War. ... Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, University of New South Wales Press, Sydney, 2010 Strong, A. The Story of the Anzacs.

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Author: Alistair Thomson

Publisher: Monash University Publishing

ISBN: 9781921867583

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 115

Anzac Memories was first published to acclaim in 1994, and has achieved international renown for its pioneering contribution to the study of war memory and mythology. Michael McKernan wrote that the book gave ‘as good a picture of the impact of the Great War on individuals and Australia as we are likely to get in this generation’, and Michael Roper concluded that ‘an immense achievement of this book is that it so clearly illuminates the historical processes that left men like my grandfather forever struggling to fashion myths which they could live by’. In this new edition Alistair Thomson explores how the Anzac legend has transformed over the past quarter century, how a ‘post-memory’ of the Great War creates new challenges and opportunities for making sense of the national past, and how veterans’ war memories can still challenge and complicate national mythologies. He returns to a family war history that he could not write about twenty years ago because of the stigma of war and mental illness, and he uses newly released Repatriation files to question his own earlier account of veterans’ post-war lives and memories and to think afresh about war and memory.

Serving in Silence

Jeffrey Grey, 'In Every War but One? Myth, History and Vietnam,' in Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, ed. Craig Stockings (Sydney: UNSW Press, 2010), 190–212. J.G. Pairman, 'In Which We Serve', OutRage (December 1988): 39.

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Author: Noah Riseman

Publisher: NewSouth

ISBN: 9781742244143

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 585

Australian LGBT servicemen and women

Transnational Tourism Experiences at Gallipoli

Australian dictionary of biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. ... Australian Historical Studies, 46(1), 81–99. ... Zombie myths of Australian military history: The 10 myths that will not die.

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Author: Jim McKay

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789811300264

Category: Social Science

Page: 185

View: 287

This book offers a fresh account of the Anzac myth and the bittersweet emotional experience of Gallipoli tourists. Challenging the straightforward view of the Anzac obsession as a kind of nationalistic military Halloween, it shows how transnational developments in tourism and commemoration have created the conditions for a complex, dissonant emotional experience of sadness, humility, anger, pride and empathy among Anzac tourists. Drawing on the in-depth testimonies of travellers from Australia and New Zealand, McKay shines a new and more complex light on the history and cultural politics of the Anzac myth. As well as making a ground breaking, empirically-based intervention into the culture wars, this book offers new insights into the global memory boom and transnational developments in backpacker tourism, sports tourism and “dark” or “dissonant” tourism.

Our Corner of the Somme

Anzac's Dirty Dozen: 12 Myths of Australian Military History, NewSouth Publishing, Sydney, 2012 —–Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, UNSW Press, Sydney, 2010 Strachan, H., The First World War: A New Illustrated History, ...

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Author: Romain Fathi

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108650595

Category: History

Page:

View: 596

By the time of the Armstice, Villers-Bretonneux - once a lively and flourishing French town - had been largely destroyed, and half its population had fled or died. From March to August 1918, Villers-Bretonneux formed part of an active front line, at which Australian troops were heavily involved. As a result, it holds a significant place in Australian history. Villers-Bretonneux has since become an open-air memorial to Australia's participation in the First World War. Successive Australian governments have valourised the Australian engagement, contributing to an evolving Anzac narrative that has become entrenched in Australia's national identity. Our Corner of the Somme provides an eye-opening analysis of the memorialisation of Australia's role on the Western Front and the Anzac mythology that so heavily contributes to Australians' understanding of themselves. In this rigorous and richly detailed study, Romain Fathi challenges accepted historiography by examining the assembly, projection and performance of Australia's national identity in northern France.

Don t Mention the War

What the Australian Defence Force thinks of its coverage in the Australian media, and why', Media International Australia, No. 148 (August) 2013, pp.22–38. ... Myth, history and Vietnam', Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, ed.

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Author: Kevin Foster

Publisher: Monash University Publishing

ISBN: 9781922235183

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 817

The war in Afghanistan is now the longest and, arguably, worst reported conflict in Australian history. In Don’t Mention the War, Kevin Foster explores why this is so and considers who engineered and who has benefitted from its impoverished coverage. He examines how and why the Australian Defence Force restricted the media’s access to and freedom of movement among its troops in Afghanistan and what we can learn about their motives and methods from the more liberal media policies of the Dutch and Canadian militaries. He analyses how the ADF ensured positive coverage of its endeavours by bringing many aspects of the reporting of the war in-house and why some among the fourth estate were only too happy to hand over responsibility for newsgathering to the military. The book also investigates how political responses to the conflict, and the discourse that framed them, served to conceal the facts and neuter public debate about the war. After more than a decade of evasion and obstruction, half-truths and hype, Don’t Mention the War reveals how politicians, the military and the media failed the public over the Afghan conflict. Here is the real story behind the Australian story of the war.

New Perceptions of the Vietnam War

90 Even if Indigenous military service in Vietnam does not hold a central place in Australian and American historical narratives, that does not take ... Myth, history and Vietnam,” in Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, ed.

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Author: Nathalie Huynh Chau Nguyen

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786495092

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 652

"Forty years after the fall of Saigon, this important collection provides fresh insights into the history of the Vietnam War and the multiple ways its political and cultural legacies continue to reverberate around the world. This is not only a timely and highly interesting volume, but also one that breaks new ground in bringing cross-disciplinary perspectives to bear in the reassessment of the Vietnam War."—Kate Darian-Smith, University of Melbourne "Nathalie Huynh Chau Nguyen brings together a range of scholarly approaches in offering fresh perspectives on the Vietnam War. In particular, the firm redirection of attention to the Republic of Vietnam, its institutions and citizens is a most welcome development and one that should prompt a rebalancing of historical accounts which, till now, have largely elided the South Vietnamese from their history. Solidly based on a wide range of public, private, published and archival sources in English, French and Vietnamese, New Perceptions of the Vietnam War will offer much of interest to all those with an interest in one of the most important Cold War conflicts of the second half of the 20th century."--Jeffrey Grey, UNSW Canberra at the Australian Defence Force Academy. The effects of the Vietnam War outside the borders of the Vietnamese state are ongoing. The presence of substantial Vietnamese communities in countries that participated in the conflict is contributing to changing interpretations of the war. This international collection of essays examines the war from new perspectives--including those of the Vietnamese diaspora--and explores ways in which perceptions of the war been have altered in recent years. The war is examined through the lens of history, politics, biography and literature, with Vietnamese, American, Australian and French scholars providing new insights on its reassessment. Twelve chapters cover South Vietnamese leadership and policies, women and civilians, veterans overseas, the involvement of smaller allies in the war (Australia), accounts by U.S., Australian and South Vietnamese servicemen as well as those of Indigenous soldiers in the U.S. and Australia, memorials and commemoration, and the legacy of war on individual lives, memories and government policy.

Return to Vietnam

48 The Australian Vietnam Forces National Memorial. Vietnam Veterans of Australia Association. www.vvaa.org.au/memorial.htm See: Jeffrey Grey, “In Every War but One? Myth, History and Vietnam.” In Zombie Myths of Australian Military ...

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Author: Mia Martin Hobbs

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108967891

Category: History

Page:

View: 103

Between 1981 and 2016, thousands of American and Australian Vietnam War veterans returned to Việt Nam. This comparative, transnational oral history offers the first historical study of these return journeys. It shows how veterans returned in search of resolution, or peace, manifesting in shifting nostalgic visions of 'Vietnam.' Different national war narratives shaped their returns: Australians followed the 'Anzac' pilgrimage tradition, whereas for Americans the return was an anti-war act. Veterans met former enemies, visited battlefields, mourned friends, found new relationships, and addressed enduring legacies of war. Many found their memories of war eased by witnessing Việt Nam at peace. Yet this peacetime reality also challenged veterans' wartime connection to Vietnamese spaces. The place they were nostalgic for was Vietnam, a space in war memory, not Việt Nam, the country. Veterans drew from wartime narratives to negotiate this displacement, performing nostalgic practices to reclaim their sense of belonging.

The British Empire and the First World War

Dennis et al., Oxford Companion, 83–4; Horner, Australia's Military History, 130–1. Bou, Light Horse, 185, 188–9; ... Elizabeth Greenhalgh, 'Australians Broke the Hindenburg Line', in Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, ed.

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Author: Ashley Jackson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317374640

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 747

The British Empire played a crucial part in the First World War, supplying hundreds of thousands of soldiers and labourers as well as a range of essential resources, from foodstuffs to minerals, mules, and munitions. In turn, many imperial territories were deeply affected by wartime phenomena, such as inflation, food shortages, combat, and the presence of large numbers of foreign troops. This collection offers a comprehensive selection of essays illuminating the extent of the Empire’s war contribution and experience, and the richness of scholarly research on the subject. Whether supporting British military operations, aiding the British imperial economy, or experiencing significant wartime effects on the home fronts of the Empire, the war had a profound impact on the colonies and their people. The chapters in this volume were originally published in Australian Historical Studies, The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, First World War Studies or The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs.

Anzac and Empire

Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, UNSW Press, Sydney, 2010 Crotty, Martin, 'Naive militarism: Australia's World War I generation', in Martin Crotty & David Andrew Roberts (eds), Great Mistakes of Australian History, ...

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Author: John Connor

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107009509

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 235

View: 487

The story behind the man central to how Australia planned for, and fought in, WWI.

Climax at Gallipoli

For a critique of the myths surrounding the August Offensive, see R. Crawley, “The Myths of August at Gallipoli,” in Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, ed. C. Stockings (Sydney: University of New South Wales Press, 2010), ...

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Author: Rhys Crawley

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806145280

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 391

Gallipoli: the mere name summons the story of this well-known campaign of the First World War. And the story of Gallipoli, where in August 1915 the Allied forces made their last valiant effort against the Turks, is one of infamous might-have-beens. If only the Allies had held out a little longer, pushed a little harder, had better luck—Gallipoli might have been the decisive triumph that knocked the Ottoman Empire out of the First World War. But the story is just that, author Rhys Crawley tells us: a story. Not only was the outcome at Gallipoli not close, but the operation was flawed from the start, and an inevitable failure. A painstaking effort to set the historical record straight, Climax at Gallipoli examines the performance of the Allies’ Mediterranean Expeditionary Force from the beginning of the Gallipoli Campaign to the bitter end. Crawley reminds us that in 1915, the second year of the war, the Allies were still trying to adapt to a new form of warfare, with static defense replacing the maneuver and offensive strategies of earlier British doctrine. In the attempt both the MEF at Gallipoli and the British Expeditionary Force on the Western Front aimed for too much—and both failed. To explain why, Crawley focuses on the operational level of war in the campaign, scrutinizing planning, command, mobility, fire support, interservice cooperation, and logistics. His work draws on unprecedented research into the files of military organizations across the United Kingdom and Australia. The result is a view of the Gallipoli Campaign unique in its detail and scope, as well as in its conclusions—a book that looks past myth and distortion to the facts, and the truth, of what happened at this critical juncture in twentieth-century history.

Our Friend the Enemy

Bean, C.E.W., 'Anzac Bay, 19 December', Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, Monday 10 January 1916. ... 'The myths of August at Gallipoli' in C. Stockings (ed), Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, New South Books, Sydney, 2010.

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Author: David W. Cameron

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781922132758

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 369

Our Friend the Enemy is the first detailed history of the Gallipoli campaign at Anzac since Charles Bean’s Official History. Viewed from both sides of the wire and described in first-hand accounts. Australian Captain Herbert Layh recounted that as they approached the beach on 25 April that, once we were behind cover the Turks turned their .. [fire] on us, and gave us a lively 10 minutes. A poor chap next to me was hit three times. He begged me to shoot him, but luckily for him a fourth bullet got him and put him out of his pain. Later that day, Sergeant Charles Saunders, a New Zealand engineer, described his first taste of battle, The Turks were entrenched some 50-100 yards from the edge of the face of the gully and their machine guns swept the edges. Line after line of our men went up, some lines didn’t take two paces over the crest when down they went to a man and on came another line. Gunner Recep Trudal of the Turkish 27th Regiment wrote of the fierce Turkish counter-attack on 19 May designed to push the Anzac’s back into the sea, It started at morning prayer call time, and then it went on and on, never stopped. You know there was no break for eating or anything … Attack was our command. That was what the Pasha said. Once he says “Attack”, you attack, and you either die or you survive.

Shadows of ANZAC

Wartime: Official Magazine of the Australian War Memorial, No. 38, 2007, pp. 14–17. ——, 'The myths of August at Gallipoli' in C. Stockings (ed), Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, New South Books, Sydney, 2010, pp. 50–69.

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Author: David W. Cameron

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781922132192

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 658

On 25 April 1915, with the landing of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) below the slopes of Sari Bair on the Gallipoli peninsula, the ANZAC legend was born. Nine months later, having suffered thousands of casualties from disease, hand-to-hand fighting, bombing, sniping and forlorn charges across no man’s land, the politicians and senior military commanders in London called it quits. While the Turks also suffered terribly, they at least emerged victorious. The fighting at Anzac was not restricted to the ANZACs and Turks alone. British troops also fought at Anzac from the earliest days of the invasion and large numbers of British and Indian troops were committed to the Anzac sector during the failed August offensive designed to break the stalemate. The invasion was also supported by large numbers of men — often non-combatants — who performed vital roles. Naval beach officers kept logistics operating in some form of ‘orderly’ fashion; Indian mule handlers moved supplies of food, water and ammunition to the front lines; and medical staff and army chaplains worked on the beach, caring for the wounded and the dead. All these men were frequently under fire from the Turkish battery known as ‘Beachy Bill’. Others surveyed the narrow beachhead and bored deep holes for drinking water; signallers tried desperately to establish and maintain communications; and the gunners hunted the battlefield for suitable places to site their guns. Off the peninsula, but just as vital, were the nursing and medical staff on the hospital ships, at Lemnos, Alexandria, Cairo and Malta, and the airmen who flew above the battlefield spotting for the navy and artillery. Shadows of Anzac: An intimate history of Gallipoli tells the story of the ‘ordinary’ men and women who participated in the Gallipoli campaign from April to December 1915 and gave the Anzac legend meaning. Drawing on letters, diaries and other primary and secondary sources, David Cameron provides an intimate and personal perspective of Anzac, a richly varied portrayal that describes the absurdity, monotony and often humour that sat alongside the horrors of the bitter fight to claim the peninsula.

The Long Shadow

Zombie Myths of Australian Military History, NewSouth, Sydney, 2010 Strevens, Steve, The Jungle Dark, Macmillan, Sydney, 2015 Tate, Don, The War Within, iUniverse, Bloomington IN, 2012 (2nd revised edn) Tchounwou, Paul B., ...

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Author: Peter Yule

Publisher: NewSouth Publishing

ISBN: 9781742245034

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 109

'Most veterans were either alcoholics or workaholics and I fitted into the latter category.' — Chris Cannin (6RAR, 1967; 7RAR, 1967-68) 'When I look back and I see what I used to do … there were a lot of things wrong that I would never ever admit to at the time … I thought I was fine, but I wasn't.' — Alan Thornton (17 CONSTRUCTION SQUADRON, 1968–69) The medical and psychological legacies of the Vietnam War are major and continuing issues for veterans, their families and the community, yet the facts about the impact of Agent Orange, post-traumatic stress disorder and other long-term health aspects are little understood. The Long Shadow sets the record straight about the health of Vietnam veterans and reveals a more detailed and complex picture. Profiling the stories of the veterans themselves, this comprehensive and authoritative book is a pioneering work of history on the aftermath of war. It takes a broad approach to the medical legacies, exploring the post-war experiences of Vietnam veterans, the evolution and development of the repatriation system in the post-Vietnam decades and the evolving medical understanding of veterans' health issues.